Chueh-chu: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the chueh-chu, a Chinese poetic form.
Author:
Publish date:

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the chueh-chu, a Chinese poetic form.

Image placeholder title

Chueh-chu Poems

The chueh-chu is a Chinese poetic form that Robin Skelton's The Shapes of Our Singing claims translates to mean "sonnet cut short." As such, it does act a bit like an eight-line sonnet broken into two quatrains.

Here are three possible rhyme schemes suggested by Skelton:

  • aaba/cada
  • abcb/dbeb
  • aaba/aaca

Note on syllables: For my example below, I tried out a Wu-yen-shih meter mentioned by Skelton in his book. But it's my understanding that any syllable count could work, though it should probably be consistent. So eight syllables per line is fine, or 10, or nine, or whatever you decide.

*****

Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

While your focus as a poet will always be on refining your craft, why not cultivate a following along the way? With the multitude of social networking opportunities available today, it’s never been easier to connect with other poetry enthusiasts. Within minutes, you can set up a blog and share your poems and insights with like-minded readers.

Discover how to expand your readership and apply it to your poetry sharing goals today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a chueh-chu:

Proposal, by Robert Lee Brewer

love birds — hear them sing
love cats — do their thing
for you — i will yearn
for you — i will ring

church bells — hear them swing
spring birds — all take wing
for you — i will say
i do — here's the ring

Payal Doshi: On Letting Rejection Bring You Clarity

Payal Doshi: On Letting Rejection Bring You Clarity

Middle-grade author Payal Doshi discusses the sometimes-disheartening process of querying a novel and how she used rejection to fuel her passion for writing.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: Writer’s Digest Conference Announcements and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce that our 2021 Annual Conference will be virtual, registration is open for our 2021 in-person Novel Conference, and more!

Rajani LaRocca: On Letting Your Synopsis Guide Your Writing

Rajani LaRocca: On Letting Your Synopsis Guide Your Writing

In this article, middle-grade author Rajani LaRocca discusses how the synopsis for her newest release, Much Ado About Baseball, guided her writing process.

From Script

Adding Your Personal Connection to Your Stories and Building Your Brand As a Writer (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by ScriptMag.com, Script’s Editor Sadie Dean interviews Dickinson creator/showrunner/EP Alena Smith, learn how to divide and conquer as screenwriter in the business and creating fruitful relationships. Plus, a brand new Script Talk video interview with writer/director/actress Djaka Souaré about her journey as a mentor and mentee in the WOCUnite and #StartWith8Hollywood mentorship programs.

Poetic Forms

Englyn Penfyr: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the englyn penfyr, a Welsh tercet form.

Editorial Road-Mapping: Start Your Self-Editing Process Here

Editorial Road-Mapping: Start Your Self-Editing Process Here

Editorial road-mapping begins with a challenge of willpower and ends with a battle-plan for transforming your manuscript into the book you dreamed it could be. Let editor Kris Spisak give you that map!

6 Tips for Writing a Summer Romance Novel

6 Tips for Writing a Summer Romance Novel

Summer. Three whole months of bright sunsets and glittering water and endless possibility. Here are 6 tips from romance writer Rachael Lippincott for capturing a tiny bit of that magic in the pages of your next summer romance novel.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Running Empty

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Running Empty

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, consider what happens when resources begin to run low or out.

5 Tips for Creating a Fully Realized Historical Setting

5 Tips for Creating a Fully Realized Historical Setting

Research is more than just reading books and articles. Here, author Nekesa Afia gives her top 5 tips for writing a historical setting that will engage and wow your readers.