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Cethramtu Rannaigechta Moire: Poetic Asides

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the cethramtu rannaigechta moire, an Irish poetic form.

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the cethramtu rannaigechta moire, an Irish poetic form.

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Cethramtu Rannaigechta Moire Poems

The cethramtu rannaigechta moire is an Irish poetic form comprised of quatrains (or four-line stanzas).

Here are the simplest guidelines:

  • Comprised of quatrains (or four-line stanzas).
  • All the lines have three syllables.
  • Lines two and four end rhyme.

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Here’s my attempt at a cethramtu rannaigechta moire:

Summer, by Robert Lee Brewer

Two slow dogs
chase fast boys
through tall grass
to their toys.

Don't look back
or ahead
until you
find your bed.

Then fall long
into sleep—
secret dreams
that you keep.

Dogs sleep too
under trees
in the shade—
buzzing bees.

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