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2019 April PAD Challenge: Day 18

For today’s prompt, take the phrase "Little (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write your poem. Possible titles include: "Little Guy," "Little Richard," "Little Mermaid," "Little Italy," and "Little Words That Pack a Big Punch." I think if you think about it for a little bit, you'll find a big (or little) poem to write.

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Poem Your Days Away!

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Online poetry prompts are great! But where can you get your poem fix when you unplug? The answer is the Smash Poetry Journal, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This book collects 125 poetry prompts from the Poetic Asides blog, gives poets plenty of room to write poems, and a lot of other great poetic information. Perfectly sized to carry in a backpack or purse, you can jot down ideas for poems as you’re waiting in line for a morning coffee or take it to the park for a breezy afternoon writing session (or on a bus, at a laundromat, or about anywhere else you can imagine–except under water, unless you’re in a submarine or a giant breathable plastic bubble).

Anyway, it’s great for prompting poems, and you should order a copy today. (Maybe order an extra one as a gift for a friend.)

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Little Blank Poem:

“little broken heart”

i was fifteen when i suffered my first broken heart
i lost fifteen pounds in a week
because i couldn't eat anything
without feeling like it would come back up
it was the krakatoa of broken hearts
& i'm lucky i survived it
& i've had several little heart breaks since
each one painful but not devastating
each one longing to lay waste
to the villagers of my soul
who refuse to live anywhere other than
in the smoldering shadow of my little broken heart

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He has suffered through a heartbreak or two in his time. Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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