2014 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 12

Author:
Publish date:

This week, cold has been sweeping across parts of North America. While the effects of the cold can be seen (whether it's snow, frost, or puffs of breath), the cold itself is something that cannot be seen--only felt. Cue today's prompt.

For today's prompt, write a poem for and/or about something that cannot be seen. I mentioned cold, but there are so many more possibilities, including love, gravity, the future, thoughts, and sound waves. Our lives are filled with things we know exist but which we can't see.

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Write the Poem That Wins $1,000!

Writer’s Digest has extended the deadline to their Writer’s Digest Poetry Awards competition to November 21. As you may have guessed from the bold statement above, the winner will receive $1,000 cash!

The winning poem will also be published in a future issue of Writer’s Digest magazine. And the winning poet will receive a copy of the 2015 Poet’s Market.

Even poets who don’t win can win, because there are prizes for 2nd through 25th place as well.

Click to learn more.

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Here's my attempt at a Something That Cannot Be Seen poem:

"Daddy"

Reese hit me. Only because Will
was annoying me. Hahaha.

Shut up. Reese said shut up. Because
Hannah is being annoying.

Ouch. Ouch! Aaaaa!!! Now what? Ow, ouch, ow.
Will hit me--a bunch. Reese hurt me.

Everybody quit it, just quit,
or I'm turning this car around.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

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He has no idea what his kids are always doing in the backseat, but it often sounds very horrible. All he can do is keep his eyes on the road and hope everyone makes to their destination safely.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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