2013 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 20

Author:
Publish date:

After today's poem is done, we'll all be 67% of the way through this challenge. That's right! We're nearing the finish line on this poeming intensive. If you've been gliding through the month, keep that form. If you've been struggling, take heart, dig deep, and push for the finish!

For today's prompt, take the phrase "Always (blank)," replace the blank with a new word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: "Always on My Mind," "Always Wrong," "Always Writing Poems That Don't Sound as Good the Next Day," etc.

Here's my attempt at an Always Blank poem:

"Always Being Watched"

By video cameras,
my credit cards,

every time I log in
or log out,

my cell phone,
but never

the people
distracted

by their cell phones,
video games,

credit cards,
status updates,

spiraling
in and out

of databases
collecting us all.

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor and a human being constantly concerned with whether he's distributing his time in the best way. He started off the month thinking he'd explore themes of privacy versus security and how surveillance factors into the equation. However, he quickly abandoned that idea for just writing little poems named after cities. Robert is the author of Solving the World's Problems, which is completely devoid of poems named after cities (though there are a few specific locations mentioned in titles). He can be followed on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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