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2011 April PAD Challenge: Day 15

After today's poem, we'll be half the way to completing this challenge. (Oh yeah, and some people might have to do their taxes today--just a reminder.) Also, I want to let you all know that nominations are currently being accepted for the 2011 Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere. I was awarded this honor along with Sina Queyras last year, and I've personally nominated Jessie Carty this year, because she's a great poet and a force for poetry. Of course, I could say the same of many Poetic Asides members. Many of you do so much for poetry online and in person. In fact, click here if you'd like to nominate anyone (including yourself--if you really think you're all that).

Since I've already won the honor, I'm not eligible, so please don't nominate me. However, there are many great poet-bloggers who work in this and other poetic communities.

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For today's prompt, write a profile poem. When I think of a profile poem, I'm thinking of social media profiles. Personally, I have one for Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and other sites like the Writer's Digest Community website. So you could write a poem that is your own profile, or that of another person (like what would Edgar Allan Poe or Emily Dickinson put in their Facebook profiles). Of course, I'll accept other takes on the prompt, such as describing a physical profile, or a piece on criminal profiling, etc. As always, the main thing is to write a poem.

Here's my attempt:

"Robert Lee Brewer"

Writes, reads, and makes babies. That is,
when he's not editing books or websites.
Or leading den meetings. Or changing his
appearance, though he mostly looks like
a person with a face, two arms and two
legs. He tries to be honest and sincere,
but his greatest fear is not being able to
help others. He rarely drinks booze or beer,
which seems to contradict his last name,
but he puts more stock in his middle one,
though lees would make it kind of the same.
He writes poems while there's still a sun
around which the planet Earth can gravitate,
and he believes in ideas like love and fate.

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Follow me and my loose sonnets on Twitter @robertleebrewer

Tweet about your April poeming on Twitter with the #aprpad hashtag.

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Bring your characters to life
One of the most important elements to connecting with readers is being able to bring your characters to life, whether you're writing fiction, nonfiction, or even poetry. In Breathing Life Into Your Characters, author Rachel Ballon teaches writers how to accomplish this through creating back stories and case histories, exploring motivations, understanding what makes a character tick, and more.

Click here to learn more.

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