2010 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 23

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Wow! We're only a week away from completing another November PAD Chapbook Challenge. Of course, for many, this is likely to be the busiest week of the month. But I'm sure everyone can push through and hit the finish line. Let's do it!

For today's "Two for Tuesday" prompt, write one of the following (or both if you're an overachiever):

  1. Write a form poem. This poem can cover any subject you want, but it should be written using a poetic form. Could be haiku, sestina, triolet, shadorma, paradelle, or some other poetic form. (Click here to see a list of 35 poetic forms.)
  2. Write an anti-form poem. This poem doesn't have to follow a poetic form, but it should communicate the poet's distaste for poetic forms.

(Also, just in case you need a subject to help get you started on the form poems: Write a poem about magic. Note: This is an optional prompt.)

Here's my attempt:

"Going to the zoo"

Going to the zoo
looking for a moo
cow or at least a bear;
they have them there.
Maybe a baby panda
or goose from Canada
or monitor lizard
with a turkey gizzard.
Animals in cages
on different stages
for us to all gawk;
maybe we'll see hawks
or tigers and lions
or seals and sea lions.
So many things to see
we have to pay a fee.
Going to the zoo
to look for kangaroos
and maybe ride a train
if it doesn't rain.

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

(Tweet your November PAD Chapbook Challenge progress on Twitter using the #novpad hashtag; also tweet poetic on Tuesdays using the #poettues hashtag.)

*****

I wrote Skeltonic Verse above. Click here to learn more than 30 other poetic forms.

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