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2010 April PAD Challenge: Day 29

Today is the last day to cast a vote for the Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere competition. As of a few minutes ago, I was holding a 2-vote lead, though I was behind in the voting for much of yesterday afternoon. So, this could definitely go either way. If you can and are willing, I'd really appreciate you taking literally a minute or so to click on the link below and cast a vote for me. With a 2-vote margin, each vote really does count. (In fact, if you are able to spread the word in any way and feel so inclined, I would totally be in your debt.)

Whether I win or lose, I want to throw out a very special thank you to everyone. It has been an amazing experience to not only receive so many votes and so much support, but to also hear all the personal stories of how my blog and (very importantly) this community has really helped poets not only write but also find the courage to submit their work and find publication. I can only take so much credit for that, and everyone one of you deserve the rest. Personally, I have grown a lot since I started this blog because of you. So thank you--so much.

If you are willing and able, click here to vote.

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We're about to finish another challenge, and though we had various obstacles (including tech issues) we're finishing strong and supportive of each other. I hope everyone has fun selecting up to five poems to send my way. While I haven't been able to read everything this month, I have read quite a few that have blown my top off. Some have even made me laugh out loud. So, I am looking forward to reading those in May and June.

Click here to read the guidelines on submitting.

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For today's prompt, I want you to take the phrase "And Suddenly (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write the poem. Some examples: "And suddenly we were lost," "And suddenly over," "And suddenly banana," "And suddenly sudden," "And suddenly the poem I was writing turned into a killer robot," etc.

Here's my attempt:

"And suddenly you"

-for Tammy

In the morning, it's a match across a striker
flung into a pile of leaves. No one knows
if the wind will help or blow it out. No one
notices it burning. So there is no water around
by evening when the whole forest is ablaze,
and here we are with our tanks of gasoline.

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Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

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