Writing and Selling Your Mystery Novel Revised and Expanded: Worksheets

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Thank you for purchasing Writing and Selling Your Mystery Novel Revised and Expanded by Hallie Ephron. Click on the links below to access printable versions of all worksheets found in the book.

Worksheet Collection (all worksheets in one document)

Now You Try: Premise Writing (Worksheet 1.1)

Now You Try: Appearance—What to Convey, What to Hide (Worksheet 2.1)

Now You Try: Appearance—Get Down the Basics (Worksheet 2.2)

Now You Try: Status and Ambition (Worksheet 2.3)

Now You Try: Background Decisions (Worksheet 2.4)

Now You Try: Talents and Skills (Worksheet 2.5)

Now You Try: Personality Traits (Worksheet 2.6)

Now You Try: Under Duress (Worksheet 2.7)

Now You Try: Tastes and Preferences (Worksheet 2.8)

Now You Try: Personality Traits (Worksheet 2.9)

Now You Try: Why Your Character Might Lie (Worksheet 2.10)

Now You Try: Name Your Protagonist (Worksheet 2.11)

On Your Own: Planning Your Protagonist (Worksheet 2.12)

Now You Try: The Victim's Secrets (Worksheet 3.1)

Now You Try: Spending Time in Your Villain's Head (Worksheet 4.1)

Now You Try: Make the Crime Fit the Villain (Worksheet 4.2)

Now You Try: The Suspect's Secrets (Worksheet 5.1)

On Your Own: Innocent Suspects (Worksheet 5.2)

Now You Try: Traits for a Sidekick (Worksheet 6.1)

Now You Try: Find an Adversary (Worksheet 6.2)

On Your Own: Creating a Character Web for Your Novel (Worksheet 7.1)

Now You Try: Including Concurrent Events (Worksheet 8.1)

Now You Try: Making the Most of "When" (Worksheet 8.2)

Now You Try: Making the Most of "Where" (Worksheet 8.3)

Now You Try: Making the Most of the Backdrop (Worksheet 8.4)

Now You Try: Imagining a Personal Space (Worksheet 8.5)

Now You Try: Your Sleuth's Quest (Worksheet 9.1)

Now You Try: Find Your Opening Scene (Worksheet 9.2)

Now You Try: Analyze Plot Structure (Worksheet 9.3)

Now You Try: Outline the Main Turning Points (Worksheet 9.4)

Now You Try: Map a Multiple-Character Time Line (Worksheet 9.5)

Now You Try: Examining Your Favorite Titles (Worksheet 10.1)

A Blueprint for Planning a Mystery Novel

Now You Try: Sketch Out a Dramatic Opening (Worksheet 11.1)

Now You Try: Introduce a Major Character (Worksheet 13.1)

Now You Try: Introduce a Minor Character (Worksheet 13.2)

Now You Try: Introduce a Walk-On (Worksheet 13.3)

Now You Try: Continue Writing the Scene (Worksheet 14.1)

Now You Try: Revise the Narrator (Worksheet 15.1)

Now You Try: Slipping and Sliding Point of View (Worksheet 15.2)

Now You Try: Write a Diner of Your Own (Worksheet 17.1)

Now You Try: Adding Body Language (Worksheet 18.1)

Now You Try: Mix Up Clues and Red Herrings (Worksheet 18.2)

Now You Try: Analyze Suspense (Worksheet 19.1)

Now You Try: Create Suspense (Worksheet 19.2)

Now You Try: Analyze Action (Worksheet 20.1)

Now You Try: Mapping Out the Action (Worksheet 20.2)

Now You Try: Revise to Eliminate Clinical Detail (Worksheet 20.3)

Now You Try: Write Introspection (Worksheet 21.1)

Now You Try: Put Backstory into Narration or Dialogue (Worksheet 22.1)

Now You Try: Layer Backstory into a Memory or Flashback (Worksheet 22.2)

Now You Try: Hitting Bottom (Worksheet 23.1)

Now You Try: Write the Final Coda (Worksheet 24.1)

On Your Own: Flying High (Worksheet 25.1)

Now You Try: Combine Dialogue and Action (Worksheet 26.1)

Now You Try: Get the Most Out of the Critique (Worksheet 27.1)

Now You Try: Find Your Own Fix (Worksheet 27.2)

Now You Try: Create an Action Plan to Target Agents (Worksheet 29.1)

Now You Try: Prepare to Approach Small Presses (Worksheet 29.2)

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