The FATAL FOUR in Arch Villain Madness is Here - Vote Now!

Voldemort. Sauron. Count Olaf. Professor Moriarty. These evil-doers are your Fatal Four. Who moves on to the final matchup? It's all up to you. Vote now in our Arch Villain Madness Best Book Villain competition.
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We're down the the FATAL FOUR. After a couple weeks of heated battles that saw many classic and modern greats fall, we're left three of the most evil villains of all time: Lord Voldemort, Count Olaf, Professor Moriarty and Sauron. It's your job to help us narrow it down to the most despicable two to battle it out for the title of Best Book Villain.

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Welcome (or welcome back) to the Writer's Digest Arch Villain Madness of Famous Book Bad Guys. We want to know: Who is the Best Book Villain of All-Time? Who will move on? That's up to you. Voting starts today here on the blog, on Facebook and on Twitter, and lasts until on Tuesday, April 4 at noon. Then, on Tuesday, we'll launch the final for one full day of voting to find the most evil evil-doer and crown a champion.

Please share far and wide so we can get as many votes as possible, and make your voice heard by simply clicking on the book cover below of the villains you want to see move on to the next round.

It's time for Arch Villain Madness! Who's the #BestBookVillain? We're about to find out. Vote now!

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Brian A. Klems is the editor of this blog, online editor of Writer's Digest and author of the popular gift bookOh Boy, You're Having a Girl: A Dad's Survival Guide to Raising Daughters.

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