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Tracy Davidson: Poet Interview

2014 April PAD Challenge countdown: 3. I'm starting to feel like that X-wing fighter guy from Star Wars: A New Hope: "Almost there...alllllmmmoooossst theeeerrrreeee...almost there..." If you don't know what I'm talking about, that's totally fine: Just know that we're almost there--ready to poem away!

Tracy Davidson lives in Warwickshire, England, and enjoys writing poetry and flash fiction. Her work has appeared in various publications and anthologies, including: Mslexia, Modern Haiku, Atlas Poetica, A Hundred Gourds, The Right-Eyed Deer and Notes from the Gean. Apart from writing, Tracy enjoys reading crime novels, entering competitions, photography and travel.

Here's her Top 25 poem:

The Morning After, by Tracy Davidson

she wakes to find
a strange bed, a strange man
and a set of handcuffs

she remembers
the double vodkas, the line of coke
and a questionable kebab

her husband standing at the window

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Where are you located?

In a quiet village near Stratford-on-Avon, England.

Who are your favorite poets?

Apart from everyone on the Poetic Asides blog (and your good self) you mean?! I don't really have favourites to be honest. Poets whose collections I've enjoyed reading recently include Simon Armitage, Sophie Hannah and Billy Collins.

And I still have a soft spot for a childhood favourite--Pam Ayres, who may not be familiar to those of you in the US. Her poems are not what you would call great literature, but they're good fun. I saw her give a live performance once and she was brilliant.

As a reader, what do you like most in poems?

I'm a little old-fashioned I guess, and I still like to read good rhyming poems. Even though the majority of what I write is free verse. I like straightforward language, not flowery or pretentious stuff. And I'm fond of short Japanese forms, such as haiku and tanka, which can say an awful lot in just a few words.

What were your goals for the 2013 April PAD Challenge?

To post something every day. A goal which failed in the very first week! Life kind of got in the way. Including losing my beloved dog, Jasper, which left me moping about instead of writing.

What's next for you?

The November PAD Chapbook Challenge! I've been joining in for the past 3 Novembers, but have yet to submit a chapbook entry. Hopefully this time I will get one done.

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World's Problems. Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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