A 12-Day Plan of Simple Writing Exercises

Here's a 12-day plan of simple writing exercises to keep your creative juices flowing without eating up too much of your time. Follow this plan to create new material that you may be able to get published.
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It's the perfect time to restart your engine and get back into writing. Here, I offer up a 12-day plan of simple writing exercises to help you keep your creative juices flowing without eating up too much of your time. 

(Creative Writing Prompts for Writers.)

Follow this plan and in less than half a month, you'll not only be impressed with what you've accomplished, but you may also have something worth publishing.

12-Day Plan of Simple Writing Exercises

The 12-Day Plan of Simple Writing Exercises

Day 1:
Write 10 potential book titles of books you'd like to write.

Day 2:
Create a character with personality traits of someone you love, but the physical characteristics of someone you don't care for.

Day 3:
Write a setting based on the most beautiful place you've ever seen.

Day 4:
Write a letter to an agent telling her how wonderful you are.

Day 5:
Write a 20-line poem about a memorable moment in your life.

Day 6:
Select a book on your shelf and pick two chapters at random. Take the first line of one chapter and the last line of the other chapter and write a short story (no more than 1000 words) using those as bookends to your story.

*****

Fearless Writing William Kenower

If you love to write and have a story you want to tell, the only thing that can stand between you and the success you’re seeking isn’t craft, or a good agent, or enough Facebook friends and Twitter followers, but fear. Fear that you aren’t good enough, or fear the market is too crowded, or fear no one wants to hear from you. Fortunately, you can’t write while being in the flow and be afraid simultaneously. The question is whether you will write fearlessly.

Click to continue.

*****

Day 7:
Write a letter to yourself telling you what you need to improve in the coming 6 months.

Day 8:
Rewrite a fairy tale from the bad guy's point of view.

Day 9:
Turn on your TV. Write down the first line that you hear and write a story based on it.

Day 10:
Go sit in a public place and eavesdrop on a conversation. Turn what you hear into a short love story (no matter how much you have to twist what they say).

Day 11:
Write the acknowledgments page that will be placed in your first (next?) published book, thanking all the people who have helped you along the way.

Day 12:
Gather everything you've written over the previous 11 days. Pick your favorite. Edit it, polish it and either try to get it published or post it on the Web to share with the world. Be proud of yourself and your work.

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