What happened when the circus rolled into town? Tell us, and you might get published in WD

Author:
Publish date:

Horror stories. Literary fiction. Any and all permutations of “__-Lit.” Pastiches. Romances. Heroes. Villains. Leprechauns (it’s a phenomenon—there are always a few, no matter the prompt).

It’s time once again to open WD's doors for the eclectically great submissions to our Your Story competition.

Want a shot at getting published in the magazine? Pen a short story of 750 words or fewer based on the prompt below. Then, post the story in the comments section of Promptly, or e-mail it to yourstorycontest@fwmedia.com (entries must be pasted directly into the body of the e-mail; no attachments).

Cost:
Free.
Prize: Publication.
Deadline: Feb. 10.
Rule: One entry per person.
Leprechauns: Not required, but welcome.

Hope to see your story. Good luck.

***


WRITING PROMPT:
Your Story #32
(If you want to post your story in the comments section for other writers to read but the Captcha code isn’t working, e-mail the piece to me at writersdigest@fwmedia.com with “Promptly” in the subject line, and I’ll make sure it gets up.)

Begin your story with the following sentence: “It was on a bright, starry night that the traveling circus rolled into town.”

--

Also, a quick note from Wednesday's post: If you missed a certain edition of WD, it looks like they’re
clearing out our 2008 back issues, and have marked them down 50 percent.
To check out the stock, follow this link
and click “Price (Low to High).” Cover gals and boys include Diablo
Cody, Brad Thor, Sara Gruen and Isabel Allende, and our features feature
screenwriting, agents, literary hotspots, e-books and more.

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