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How to Break Out of a Writing Slump

When the words aren't coming, explore your other passions to replenish those creative juices.
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In the July '01 issue of Writer's Digest, Joan Mazza, national seminar leader and author of six books, gives you some pointers on how to get your creative juices flowing.

As Mazza says, "Every person who wants to write or embark on a creative journey knows how it feels to have creativity dry up. ... Rather than seeing this as part of the process, you might give up on this book and start something new. It's like leaving that familiar lover for a new and exciting one." The problem is, if you don't deal with the cause of the problem—lack of inspiration—then the same thing is guaranteed to happen with your next piece of writing.

Here are a few ideas to inspire you when your creativity has run dry:

  • List your fears. What would you have to do to chip away at them? How would you have to change your beliefs about your self to do this? Do something that feels just a little bit scary.
  • For one full day, pay attention to the sounds in your environment. On different days, focus on the colors, odors and textures that decorate your life.
  • If it suits you, journal about these meanderings or make notes on index cards.

The July issue of Writer's Digest is available for purchase online.

Check out Joan Mazza's From Dreams to Discovery ($14.99).

Learn more about Joan Mazza and her books.

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