10 Grammar (and Novel Writing) Rules that are Actually Myths

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Write better by understanding these important (yet often misunderstood) rules of grammar!

Over the course of your life, teachers and writing instructors have undoubtedly filled your head with all sorts of grammar rules. They said things like “never end a sentence with a preposition” and “you must also use the article ‘an’ before words that begin with vowels” and “you must always start your novel with action” and so forth. While 99% of what you learned is most likely true (like breaking up run-on sentences) and there are reasons they teach these things when you’re learning to write, there are a few “rules” that have been passed along that aren’t exactly accurate—and some are downright wrong.

In this free download, Myth-Busting Answers to 10 FAQs on Grammar, Writing, and Publishing, Writer’s Digest Online Editor Brian A. Klems breaks down several of the most common myths about writing. He explores the truth behind the a vs. an rule, whether or not you should avoid new agents, starting a sentence with a conjunction (like “but”) and more. Get all these grammar myths and more when you download your copy of this free eBook.

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Free eBook: A vs. An, starting a sentence with but, and other grammar myths debunked.

The 10 questions that get myth-busted in this free download:

- Ending sentences with prepositions is bad, isn’t it?

- The word “none” should always be treated as singular, right?

- Is it true that the best way to start my novel is with action?

- Isn’t it wrong to start a sentence with “and,” “but” or “because”?

- Should I avoid new agents because they might not have any industry contacts yet?

- When to use a versus an: Is it a strict rule to use “a” before consonants, and “an” before vowels?

- Is it true that “since” and “because” should not be used interchangeably?

- Doesn’t it seem like agents are just looking for excuses to reject work?

- Isn’t “plethora” just a fancy way of saying “a lot”?

- Come on, seriously: Is there a secret formula to getting published?

By downloading this free giveaway, you’ll learn that starting a sentence with however is OK (even if English teachers had forbidden you from doing all throughout high school) and that the secret formula to getting published is—well, you’ll have to download these Myth-Busting Answers to 10 FAQs on Grammar, Writing, and Publishing for that one. But remember, it’s completely free and will help you as you combat some of the so-called “rules” you’ve read on the Internet.

Free download featuring grammar and novel writing myths to help you with good grammar and punctuation.

Grab a copy of this free guide to learn about the 10 grammar rules you can break!

When is starting a sentence with because acceptable? Do you know, is none singular or plural? How about the difference between since and because? If you’ve ever gotten stuck trying to remember when to use an or a, or asked yourself any of these other questions, this eBook is for you. Writer’s Digest Online Editor Brian A. Klems will help you bust these grammar myths and give you a few examples along the way. Learn how to use plethora in a sentence, when starting a sentence with but or because is acceptable, and more. Grab this download today!

Enter your email to join the Writer's Digest newsletter and get your free download!

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