The Writer’s Digest Podcast, Episode 12: Writing for the Screen and the Page with Doug Richardson

In this episode of the Writer’s Digest Podcast, Gabriela Pereira talks with screenwriter and author Doug Richardson, and shares an inside look at the process of adapting a novel for the big screen.
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In this episode of the Writer’s Digest Podcast, Gabriela Pereira talks with screenwriter and author Doug Richardson, and shares an inside look at the process of adapting a novel for the big screen. In this interview, they discuss the differences between writing a novel and a screenplay, the role of a screenwriter on a movie set, and how to manage relationships with directors, producers, and actors. 

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Welcome, welcome, writers! From fiction to nonfiction, whatever your genre persuasion or writing style—whether you write for the page, the stage, or the screen—the Writer’s Digest podcast is for you.

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Today I have the pleasure of hosting Doug Richardson on the show!

Doug cut his teeth writing some pretty awesome movies including Die Hard 2 and Bad Boys, before entering the world of novel writing.

His Lucky Dey books exists between the gutter and the glitter of a morally suspect landscape he calls Luckyland—a.k.a. Los Angeles. He has also adapted several of his novels into screenplays.

Now listen in as Doug and I discuss the process of taking a story from novel-form to the big screen.

This episode of the Writer’s Digest Podcast is brought to you by Writer’s Digest magazine. Do you want to write a book or get published in 2019? Writer's Digest can help. For almost 100 years, WD has featured practical technique articles, tips and exercises on fiction, nonfiction, poetry and the business side of writing and publishing. Subscribe to Writer's Digest magazine at writersdigest.com/subscribe.

In this episode Doug shares:

  • The differences between writing a screenplay vs. writing a novel.
  • An inside look at the process of bringing your book to the screen.
  • The ups and downs of working with actors.
  • How to navigate the sticky situation of being a writer on a movie set.
  • Dealing with bad notes and criticisms on your screenplay.

Listen in to hear Doug talk about all these things… and more!

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About Doug Richardson

Doug Richardson cut his teeth writing movies like Die Hard 2, Bad Boys, and Hostage. But scratch the surface and discover that he thinks there’s a killer inside all of us.

His Lucky Dey books exist between the gutter and the glitter of a morally suspect landscape he calls Luckyland—a.k.a. Los Angeles—the city of Doug’s birth and where he lives with his wife, two children, three big mutts, and the dead body he’s still semi-convinced is buried in his San Fernando Valley back yard.

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