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How to Impress Literary Agents with Your 30-Second Pitch

Never miss a chance to pitch your book. With this free download you'll learn how to craft the perfect 30-second elevator pitch to impress literary agents!

Literary agents don’t have a lot of time to spare. Between reading hundreds of queries and manuscripts, attending to clients needs, negotiating with publishers and all the other important jobs they do, agents plates are pretty full.

Writing agents is one way to get their attention, but if you ever have the opportunity to talk to a literary agent in person, you must be prepared to pitch your idea in 30 seconds or fewer (this is called an "Elevator Pitch"). And we’re here to help you do that.

In this FREE online download, Your 30-Second Pitch, you’ll get tips and advice on how to cultivate a tight, well-rehearsed pitch so you never waste an opportunity again. Whether you’re pitching to New York or London literary agents, children’s or Christian literary agents, top ranking or new literary agents, or any kind of literary agent, crafting just a few key sentences and committing them to memory is exactly the way to give yourself the best chance at finding a literary agent. Get this free download to learn how to craft your 30-second pitch.

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Still trying to write the best 30 second pitch for your book? This free guide will show you how.

Sneak Peek: The 4 Components That Hook Literary Agents

One of the focuses in this free download addresses the most important components to any good (successful) sound-byte pitch. Here’s a sneak peek at what all goes in to the best type of Elevator Pitch:

1. Tell the literary agent who you are.

State your name and job title, or the title of the position you’re seeking. “Hi, my name is Miranda Mechanic, and I’m a licensed automotive mechanic who writes how-to articles for women who don’t want their cars to get the best of them.”

2. Literary agents want to know what you want.

Don’t beat around the bush. State what you’re after. “I’m interested in placing some of my articles with your magazine, Auto Care for Everybody.”

3. Show the literary agents why you’re the best choice.

List any degrees, writing credentials, training or experience that relate to what you’re seeking. “I’ve been taking mechanical things apart since before I could walk, and I’m the owner-operator of my own body shop.”Be sure the qualifications match your stated goal. Saying you want to write an article on mechanics and then listing your degrees in early Russian literature won’t help. If you’re unable to come up with any related experience, name qualities or skills you possess, such as attention to detail, passion for the subject and so on.The key is to be brief and memorable. You’re looking for that special something that separates you from the crowd.

4. Give literary agents a call to action.

You can do a great job selling yourself, but if you don’t follow through by asking for what you want, you’ve wasted your time. Take a deep breath and go for it. “I’d like to show you copies of my articles, including ‘How to Change a Tire When It’s Twenty Below Zero’ and ‘How to Add Oil When You’re Wearing a Power Suit.’ ” The call to action is what leads to further interaction. Don’t neglect this most important step.

How should you craft your best 30-second pitch? We’ll show you how in this free excerpt from Writer’s Digest.


Ready to Learn How to Make a Pitch to a Literary Agent?

Download your copy of this free guide to learn how to craft the perfect 30-second pitch today.

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