What Should Writers Blog About?

What should writers blog about if they write fiction? Poetry? Nonfiction? Do blog topics have to align with your other writing? We dive into these questions here.
Author:
Publish date:

What should writers blog about if they write fiction? Poetry? Nonfiction? Do blog topics have to align with your other writing? We dive into these questions here.

Image placeholder title

Blogging is a great way to share your thoughts with the world, connect with readers, and build a writing platform for new and experienced writers. One of the first questions I'm often asked by people interested in starting—or improving—a blog is, "What should I blog about?"

(Should writers have a blog?)

This is a great first question. I've been blogging for more than a decade, and I constantly re-evaluate my topics, my treatment, and my goals. Once you begin posting to a blog, you are creating and sharing content, and it makes a lot of sense to think about what you're sharing and why.

So, let's dig into this.

A key to success for any writer is having an online presence. Blogging is one way to share your expertise and—at the same time—build an author platform. Don't know how to start a blog? Not sure what to focus on? Don't fret! This online writing workshop will guide you through the entire blogging process—how to create and setup a blog, where to start, and much more. You'll learn how to attract readers and how to market your writing. Start a successful blog today and get noticed by editors and publishers.

Image placeholder title

Click to continue.

What Should Writers Blog About?

While I think it's important for bloggers to ask what they should post, the better first question is, "Why do you want to start a blog?" Is it for fun? Is it to share thoughts about your life? Do you have a topic that really interests you? Or do you just want to try it out because others have? Any of these reasons (or something completely different) are fine, but the reason why will help guide you to what.

(8 Blogging Tips for Writers to Find Success.)

For instance, if you're really into a specific topic (like extreme weather), then you should have a good idea of what kind of subjects you'd like to cover (hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, etc.). If you're doing it to improve your author platform, then you'll need to figure out who your target audience is and blog about things that interest them. The best blogs combine a blogger's intrinsic interests with an audience's interests.

As you can imagine, 100 people could visit this post and walk away with 100 different blog post ideas.

What Should Writers of Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry Blog About?

Over the years, I've heard so many theories about what writers of different genres should do with their blog, and it's great to consider different perspectives. But what's always worked best for me is to experiment and pay attention to responses. Then, decide whether your strategy is working.

(Should writers use social media?)

Could nonfiction blog posts work for a novelist? Possibly, if they line up with the subject of the novels. Could flash fiction posts gain traction for a person who writes nonfiction? Maybe; I've never tried it.

One thing I do know for certain: If you just do what you're told and what everyone else is doing, then you're more likely to disappear in the flood of blogs and sites that already exist. Find ways to differentiate, whether that's through content, style, or tone.

Final Word on Choosing Blog Topics

Blogging is best done through trial and error, but a good place to start is by looking at your writing goals and trying to think how your blog can complement those. If you're writing historical fiction, you'll likely do a lot of research that can't fit in the story. So share little nuggets of information on your blog and plug your fiction with each post.

Who knows? Eventually, you may become an authority on certain aspects of history and find yourself pitching a nonfiction book that complements your historical novels. Or vice versa, for whatever your subject of choice may be.

April PAD Challenge

2021 April PAD Challenge: Day 16

Write a poem every day of April with the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a city poem.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Under the Influence

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Under the Influence

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, let a character fall under the influence of something or someone.

WD-PersonalEssay-2020-WinnerGraphic

Suspended: Writer's Digest Personal Essay Awards Winner

Congratulations to J.E. Stamper, grand prize winner of the Writer's Digest Personal Essay Awards. Here's his winning essay, "Suspended."

Planting Clues: Red Herrings That Fool but Don't Frustrate Your Readers

Planting Clues: Red Herrings That Fool but Don't Frustrate Your Readers

Want to know how to keep your readers engaged and entertained with your mystery novel? Let these six tips from thriller author Kris Calvin guide you!

April PAD Challenge

2021 April PAD Challenge: Day 15

Write a poem every day of April with the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a blank story poem.

Kristin Beck: On Writing Quickly and Publishing Slowly

Kristin Beck: On Writing Quickly and Publishing Slowly

Debut novelist Kristin Beck shares what it was like to write her historical fiction novel Courage, My Love and why she was so thankful for a slow publishing process.

Whitney Hill Elemental

Whitney Hill: Self-Published E-Book Awards Winner

Whitney Hill, winner of the 8th Annual WD Self-Published E-Book Awards, talks fan fiction, creating her own stories, and why she chose to self-publish.

8 Tips to Build Your Supportive Writing Network

8 Tips to Build Your Supportive Writing Network

Writing can be a solitary activity ... but it doesn't have to be. Let author Gale Massey give you some tips for building a supportive writing network.

April PAD Challenge

2021 April PAD Challenge: Day 14

Write a poem every day of April with the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a "from where you're sitting" poem.