The Missouri Review: Market Spotlight

For this week’s market spotlight, we look at The Missouri Review, a quarterly literary journal that publishes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.
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For this week’s market spotlight, we look at The Missouri Review, a quarterly literary journal that publishes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.

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The Missouri Review: Market Spotlight

The Missouri Review was founded in 1978 and publishes five new stories, three new poetry features, and two essays in each quarterly issue. Writers published in the journal have been anthologized frequently in Best American Poetry, The O. Henry Prize Anthology, The Pushcart Prize, and other venues.

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The editors say, "We have helped shape the contemporary literary scene by offering the finest work of today's most important writers and by discovering the brightest new voices in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry."

They pay $40 per printed page.

What They’re Looking For:The Missouri Review publishes poetry features of six to 14 pages of poetry by each poet (usually three to five poets per issue). Successful submissions typically feature eight to 20 pages of unpublished poetry.

Short stories are typically between 2,000 and 9,000 words in length. The editors advise that anything longer or shorter "must be truly exceptional to be published."

All nonfiction submissions should be of general interest. The editors say, "There are no restrictions on length or topic, but we suggest that writers familiarize themselves with nonfiction from previous issues."

How to Submit: Potential writers can submit online or by post to: [genre] Editor, The Missouri Review, 375 McReynolds Hall, University of Missouri, Columbia MO 65211.

Click here to learn more and submit.

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