The Blog Reaches 1,000 Posts -- And I Offer 4 Good Reasons For You to Keep Reading It

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I passed 1,000 posts yesterday. Rock on. This blog is approaching its three-year anniversary and keeps growing. After a record-setting March in terms of page views, April's final number was 10,000 higher. Thank you to my regulars, and my commenters, and my many amazing guest bloggers. And to celebrate (at the suggestion of a wonderful commenter), I will give away 5 year-long subscriptions to WritersMarket.com (value: $50 a pop). All you have to do is comment on this post and say something nice about any book or product you've used from WD. It can be a book or webinar or magazine issue or article or whatever. Simply point out something that helped you and say one nice thing about it. I'll pick 5 winners at random one week from today.

And if you're new to this blog, let me give you four good reasons why you should add it to your usual reading. Here are four people who recently contacted me to say they signed with agents because of my blogging and links:

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1. Writer Gwen Hayes
, who says: "I found Jessica (Sinsheimer) through your GLA interview last August. She signed me in September and we sold Falling Under, in December. Quite the whirlwind!"

2. Writer Jess Haines, who says: "I found my agent through a GLA article. My first book, Hunted by the Others, came out in May 2010."

3. Writer Jen Corkill Hunt, who says: "After you posted Kimberley Shumate as a new agent, I contacted her and was signed. You're awesome and I send as many authors to you as I can. Thanks!"

4. Writer Joanna Haugen, who says: "I've been reading your blog for awhile, and when this post about Bree Ogden came through my RSS feed, I decided to try querying her with my picture book. Within a week I had signed on as a new client with Martin Literary Management. Thank you for featuring new agents ~ I never would have found Bree without this column!"

That's my version of "Show, don't tell." Hope you like it!

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