Christina Katz Post #4

Author:
Publish date:

Hi all,

Here is the fourth installment of author platform advice from Get Known Before the Book Deal author Christina Katz.

Enjoy,

Scott

Image placeholder title

20 Dual Questions About Your Author Platform

#4: Where is the best place to build a platform? / Where will you build your platform?

By Christina Katz

A lot of people today think that the only place they need to get known is online. Frankly, I think going online right out of the gate is a mistake if your objective is to build a book-deal worthy platform. Certainly, you will eventually need and want to get known online. And the Internet is a great place for getting known. But first you need to know what your specialty is. Hopping online before you know what your specialty is like hopping in the car without a destination in mind. Sure you’ll drive around, you’ll use gas…but you may never actually get anywhere.

And before everyone starts jumping down my throat, there’s nothing wrong with simply “hanging out” online. Everyone does it. But if your objective is platform development, then the Internet is very likely better as your final, not your first, testing grounds. For example, Cindy Hudson recently landed a book deal with Seal Press called Bonding Through Books: Your Complete Guide to Creating Mother-Daughter Book Clubs. Naturally, she’s online today with a burgeoning web presence that includes a Web site, a blog, an e-zine, and social networking. But Cindy did not find her specialty topic online. She drew on ten years of experience creating and maintaining mother-daughter book clubs for her two daughters right where she lives.

See what I’m saying? Cindy’s specialty (credible expertise on a specific topic) not only helped her write the book proposal that landed the agent, who helped her get the deal; it guides her promotional steps on a daily basis both live and online. Before Cindy grew her online presence, which has taken over a year so far, she attended conferences, took classes, joined organizations, wrote articles, penned book reviews for young readers and connected with a writing mentor. Her specialty guides the construction of her online presence and direct how she spends her time online. Without this kind of focused intention, you could spend a lifetime online and never get any closer to the kind of platform that can attract the attention of agents and editors.

So don’t make the mistake of thinking that the Internet is all. The in-person interactions Cindy has had with others—for example, she met her book editor in-person at a writer’s conference—have been just as important as time she spends online. And without a clear and distinct specialty and mission, Cindy would have never managed to do all the footwork it took to go from book idea to book deal in under two years.

So, if you are thinking that the Internet is the only place you need to be with your platform, think again. Unless your specialty is Internet-specific, chances are good that your specialty topic has more to do with how you spend your time offline, than with how you spend your time online.

Think about it. Then get clear about what makes you unique and distinct offline before you jump online and start clicking.

Question #3: Where will you build your platform?

I’m guessing you will build your platform offline and online. Before you jump online, take a look at how you spend your time offline. Specifically what do you do in the real world that builds credibility in your area of expertise? If nothing, then someone else with more balanced credibility is going to trump your online platform efforts. What you do offline needs to match up with what you do online.

My question for you: Where will you build your platform? What steps will you take offline? What steps will you take online? Be sure to ground your platform in the real world, not just online.

Please share your experience by commenting to this post.

Christina Katz is author of Get Known Before the Book Deal, Use Your Personal Strengths to Build an Author Platformand Writer Mama, How to Raise a Writing Career Alongside Your Kids. She started her platform “for fun” seven years ago and ended up on Good Morning America. She works on incremental writing career development with one hundred students a year and is the publisher of the e-zine Writers on the Rise. To learn more, visit http://www.christinakatz.com.

Writer's Digest March/April 2021 Cover featuring Carmen Maria Machado

Writer's Digest March/April 2021 Issue Reveal

The March/April 2021 issue of Writer's Digest is showing up in mailboxes and will soon be available at retailers. Get a sneak peek of the new columns we're introducing with the expanded page count!

How to Co-Author a Book: Building Continuity and Avoiding Pitfalls

How to Co-Author a Book: Building Continuity and Avoiding Pitfalls

Co-authors Simon Turney and Gordon Doherty share their top 5 tips for collaborating with another author on a project.

Bonnie Marcus: On Being Vulnerable in Nonfiction

Bonnie Marcus: On Being Vulnerable in Nonfiction

Award-winning entrepreneur and executive coach Bonnie Marcus shares what it was like to write her prescriptive nonfiction book Not Done Yet.

FightWrite™: Fight Scenes and Dialogue

FightWrite™: Fight Scenes and Dialogue

In this article, author and trained fighter Carla Hoch answers a writer's question about how to handle dialogue during a fight scene, including pros and cons to having dialogue at all.

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Trying to Write for Everyone

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Trying to Write for Everyone

The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake writers make is trying to write for everyone.

Poetic Forms

Ekprhasis (or Ekphrastic Poetry): Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at ekphrasis (or ekphrastic poetry) and the art of writing poems about other pieces of art.

5 Tips for Evoking Emotion in Writing

5 Tips for Evoking Emotion in Writing

Bestselling author Rebecca Yarros coaches writers on how to create believable emotion in this article.

40 Plot Twist Prompts for Writers: Writing Ideas for Bending Your Stories in New Directions, by Robert Lee Brewer

Announcing 40 Plot Twist Prompts for Writers!

Learn more about 40 Plot Twist Prompts for Writers: Writing Ideas for Bending Stories in New Directions, by Writer's Digest Senior Editor Robert Lee Brewer. Discover fun and interesting ways to move your stories from beginning to end.

The Story That Drove Me to Write

The Story That Drove Me to Write

Award-winning author Stephanie Kane shares the book that launched her career and provides insights for how you can pursue your story.