ABA Journal: Market Spotlight

For this week’s market spotlight, we look at the ABA Journal, the flagship magazine for members of the American Bar Association.
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For this week’s market spotlight, we look at the ABA Journal, the flagship magazine for members of the American Bar Association.

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ABA Journal: Market Spotlight

ABA Journal is the flagship magazine for members of the American Bar Association. With a circulation around 400,000, it's considered the magazine for lawyers and the legal profession. As such, it's a very competitive market with a reputation of paying competitive rates to freelancers.

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The editors say, "The ABA is the largest voluntary professional association in the world. With more than 400,000 members, the ABA provides law school accreditation, continuing legal education, information about the law, programs to assist lawyers and judges in their work, and initiatives to improve the legal system for the public."

What They’re Looking For

ABA Journal does not review unsolicited manuscripts. Rather, the editors want freelancers to query with their resumé and published clips. They expect articles to include multiple sources and opposing points of view.

The editors say, "The ABA Journal considers queries from professional writers or from potential sources who wish to contact us regarding subjects that might be of interest to our readers."

Estimated length and payment are discussed upon assignment.

How to Submit

Potential writers should query managing editor Kevin Davis at releases@americanbar.org.

Click here to learn more and submit.

In today's competitive marketplace, it’s important to catch an editor's attention. It all starts with a pitch. No matter what kind of article you want to write, a good pitch letter will get you noticed by an assigning editor. This intensive two-week course will teach you how to craft a good pitch letter and do it well. Be ready to mine your life for ideas. Start thinking about a great spin on a topic or an unusual personal experience that you'd like to write about in class!

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