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Upcoming Poetry Contests (January 2011)

Every so often, I get asked about upcoming poetry contests (whether via
e-mail or through social networking sites). Usually I try to answer
these inquiries one-on-one, but I've decided to start sharing upcoming
contests on here to make it easier for both myself and poets interested
in submitting their work.

WritersMarket.com is still THE place to get the most up-to-date
information for publishing your writing (whether poetry, fiction,
nonfiction, etc.), and Poet's Market is THE best book resource
specifically for poets (listing book publishers, magazines, contests,
and more).

Here's a list of upcoming contests for single poems:

  • The Malahat Review Long Poem Prize
    has a February 1 (postmark) deadline for a single long poem of 10-20
    pages in length (32 lines, including line breaks, equals a page). Entry
    fee is $35-45 (depending on location of poet). Entrants receive a 1-year
    subscription to the magazine. Two awards of $1,000 (CAD) are given for
    the best poems.
  • PNWA Literary Contest,
    offered by the Pacific Northwest Writers Association, has a February 18
    deadline. Prizes include $700 and a Zola Award for first place and $300
    for second place. Entry fee is $35 for PNWA members and $50 for
    non-members. Poets can submit up to 3 finished poems, one poem per page.
  • Random House, Inc. Creative Writing Competition
    is open to New York City public high school seniors only. With a
    February 11 (postmark) deadline, this contest has a poetry/spoken word
    category, in addition to other categories, with prizes varying between
    $500 and $10,000.
  • Utmost Christian Poetry Contest
    offers $3,000 in cash prizes, including a Grand Prize of $1,000, in
    addition to many other prizes. With a postmark deadline of February 28,
    this contest is for unpublished, individual poems by Christian poets
    only. Entry fee is $20 per poem (up to 5 poems).

Here's a list of upcoming contests for poetry collections:

  • The Robert Dana Prize for Poetry
    is offered by Anhinga Press for a poet's 1st or 2nd collection of
    poetry (previously unpublished). The winner receives $2,000, plus
    publication by Anhinga Press, in addition to a reading tour of Florida.
    The contest opens February 15 and has a postmark deadline of May 1.
  • Midland Authors Award
    has a deadline of February 15. These awards recognize the best books
    published in 2010 by authors who reside in, were born in, and/or have
    strong ties with the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas,
    Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South
    Dakota, and Wisconsin. No entry fee.
  • Paterson Poetry Prize
    has a February 1 deadline. This award, sponsored by The Poetry Center
    at Passaic County Community College, is for a previously published book
    of poems (48+ pages). The winner receives $1,000.
  • PEN Award for Poetry in Translation
    recognizes book-length translations published during the calendar year.
    With a $50 entry fee, this contest has a February 3 deadline. The
    winner receives $3,000.
  • Royal Dragonfly Book Awards
    offers a $300 grand prize, in addition to other prizes, for the best
    previously published collections in multiple categories. The entry fee
    is $50 for the first entry and $45 for each additional entry. Deadline
    is February 1.
  • WILLA Literary Awards
    honor books published in 2010. There's a $50 entry fee, and the winner
    receives $100, plus a trophy. Finalists receive plaques. Deadline is
    February 1.

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

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