Style’s Greatest Quotes

Author:
Publish date:

I’m a little late on the 5 for Friday, but I thought I’d
still have an installment of quotes from writers… So here they are: 5 writers
on STYLE from The Sound on The Page,
by Ben Yagoda. As Yagoda says, these are “Style’s Greatest Quotes.”

“The
style is the man. Rather say the style is the way the man takes himself; and to
be at all charming or even bearable, the way is almost rigidly prescribed. If
it is with outer seriousness, it must be with inner humor. If it is with outer
humor, it must be with inner seriousness. No other way will do.”

-Robert
Frost

“The
most durable thing in writing is style, and style if the most valuable
investment a writer can make with his time. It pays off slowly, your agent will
sneer at it, your publisher will misunderstand it, and it will take people you
have never heard of to convince them by slow degrees that the writer who puts
his individual mark on the way he writers will always pay off.”

-Raymond
Chandler

“Style
is a very simple matter; it is all rhythm. Once you get that, you can’t use the
wrong words.”

-Virginia
Woolf

“Your
own winning literary style must begin with interesting ideas in your head. Find
a subject you care about and which you in your heart feel others should care about.
It is this genuine caring, and not your games with language, which will be the
most compelling and seductive element in your style.”

-Kurt
Vonnegut

“If
one means by style the voice, the irreducible and always recognizable and alive
thing, then of course style is really everything.”

-Mary
McCarthy

*

From Our Readers

Describe the First Time a Book Transported You to Another/Magical World: From Our Readers (Comment for a Chance at Publication)

This post announces our latest From Our Readers ask: Describe the First Time a Book Transported You to Another/Magical World. Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer's Digest.

About Us: How to Handle Your Story That Involves Other People

About Us: How to Handle Your Story That Involves Other People

Your story belongs to you but will involve other people. Where do your rights end and theirs begin?

Identifying Your Book's Target Audience

Identifying Your Book's Target Audience

Editor-in-chief Amy Jones navigates how to know your target audience, and how knowing will make your writing stronger.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 575

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a safe poem.

ryoji-iwata-QKHmi6ENAmk-unsplash

I Spy

Every writer needs a little inspiration once and a while. For today's prompt, someone is watching your narrator ... but there's a twist.

Brian Freeman: On "Rebooting" Another Writer's Legacy

Brian Freeman: On "Rebooting" Another Writer's Legacy

In this article, Brian Freeman, author of Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Treachery, discusses how he took up the mantle of a great series and made it his own.

Sole vs. Soul (Grammar Rules)

Sole vs. Soul (Grammar Rules)

Learn how to distinguish the sole from the soul with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

How to Make the Most of a Virtual Writing Workshop or Conference

How to Make the Most of a Virtual Writing Workshop or Conference

In this brave new world of virtual learning and social distance, Kristy Stevenson helps us make the most of the virtual conference.

When Is Historical Accuracy Inaccurate?

When Is Historical Accuracy Inaccurate?

Writers of historical fiction must always ride the line between factual and fictitious. Here, author Terry Roberts discusses how to navigate that line.