Kenyon Review: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Kenyon Review, a literary magazine looking for various lengths of fiction, poetry, plays, and nonfiction. Submission period open through October 1, 2020.
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Kenyon Review is a literary magazine looking for short fiction (short stories and flash fiction), essays, poetry plays, excerpts of larger works, translations, and book reviews. Their open submission period just started on September 15 and only runs until October 1. So the clock is ticking.

(The Sun Magazine: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "Building on a tradition of excellence dating back to 1939, the Kenyon Review has evolved from a distinguished literary magazine to a pre-eminent arts organization. Today, KR is devoted to nurturing, publishing, and celebrating the best in contemporary writing. We're expanding the community of diverse readers and writers, across the globe, at every stage of their lives."

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Payment is made on publication.

What They're Looking For

Kenyon Review will consider submissions of short fiction and essays (up to 7,500 words); flash fiction and essays (up to three pieces, up to 1,000 words each, formatted and submitted as a single document); poetry (up to 6 poems, formatted and submitted as a single document); plays (up to 30 pages); excerpts (up to 30 pages) from larger works; translations of poetry and short prose; and book reviews. They don't accept unsolicited interviews or artwork; email submissions (use their Submittable page); or previously published material.

The editors say, "All submissions received during the reading period will be read. The response time will vary according to the number of submissions. We make every effort to respond to all submissions within six months of receipt."

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Writers can check their Submittable accounts for progress of their submissions. However, multiple submissions in the same genre (unless following the guidelines for poetry and flash fiction/essays) will result in rejection without submissions being read.

How to Submit

Potential writers should submit via their Submittable page by October 1, 2020.

Click here to learn more and submit.

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