Skip to main content

Hit Your Local Bookstores! (Please!)

Hey, everyone--

I know I mentioned this a couple weeks ago... but today my TV book, Small Screen, Big Picture: A Writer's Guide to the TV Business, hits shelves from Random House and Mediabistro-- so please don't be afraid to go check it out!

If you're an aspiring TV writer, this is a book you definitely don't want to miss... there are many TV writing books out there-- books about drama, books about comedy, books about pilot-writing and spec-writing-- but this book is different in that it's a user-friendly writer's guide to the business of television. TV, after all, is an industry... and the way that industry works-- the way it's structured, the way it generates profit, the way it's changing and evolving-- are the factors that ultimately affect the kinds of shows that get on TV and the kinds of shows that survive.

So Small Screen, Big Picture details how networks like NBC and studios like Warner Brothers work... how shows like NCIS or How I Met Your Mother make money (and how that affects the creative process)... how new series, such as Fringe, are pitched and developed... the real difference between shows like Lost and CSI... the pilot production process... the inner workings of a TV writers' room... how series like 24 or Desperate Housewives work differently than pilots... when/where/how/why to get an agent or manager... and, ultimately, how to use this information to break in and launch your TV career.

I'm always dismayed when I meet young writers who don't know (or care!) how the industry works... so this book is:

A) A way to get a leg up on your competition
B) My attempt to give young writers a resource I wish I'd had when I started out
C) My love letter to television

Having said all that-- please check it out! You can get it at Amazon, Borders, Barnes & Noble, or just about any other bookstore. And please... LEMME KNOW WHAT YOU THINK! (Good or bad-- I have thick skin...)

-- Chad

P.S. If you can't make it to the bookstore (or even if you can), at least become a fan on Facebook! Just click HERE. Thanks, guys!

How Writers Can Apply Business Tools to Their Writing

How Writers Can Apply Business Tools to Their Writing

Author Katherine Quevedo takes an analytical look at the creative process in hopes to help other writers find writing success.

Nick Petrie: On Following the Most Compelling Story

Nick Petrie: On Following the Most Compelling Story

Award-winning author Nick Petrie discusses how he listened to the story that wanted to be told in his new Peter Ash thriller novel, The Runaway.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 596

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a punishment poem.

Jacquelyn Mitchard: On Forgiveness in Fiction

Jacquelyn Mitchard: On Forgiveness in Fiction

Award-winning novelist Jacquelyn Mitchard discusses the chance meeting that led to her new novel, The Good Son.

Sea Bound

Sea Bound

Every writer needs a little inspiration once in a while. For today's prompt, write about someone connected to the sea.

writersMarket_wd-ad_1000x300 (1)

Get Published With the Latest Market Books Editions

Get published and find more success with your writing by using the latest editions of the Market Books, including Writer's Market, Poet's Market, Guide to Literary Agents, and more!

Michigan Quarterly Review: Market Spotlight

Michigan Quarterly Review: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Michigan Quarterly Review, the flagship literary journal of the University of Michigan.

Desperate vs. Disparate (Grammar Rules)

Desperate vs. Disparate (Grammar Rules)

This post looks at the differences between desperate and disparate with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

What Is Pastiche in Literature, and Why Is Sherlock Holmes Perfect for It?

What Is Pastiche in Literature, and Why Is Sherlock Holmes Perfect for It?

What has made Sherlock Holmes so adaptable and changeable throughout the character’s original inception? Author Timothy Miller explains.