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Pitch Your TV Idea - This Weekend (and get a special blog-only discount)!

Hey, everyone--

Just wanted to give you all a great invitation. I'm teaching/hosting a two-day pitching seminar, culminating in a "pitch slam," for Mediabistro here in L.A. this weekend. It's a great class... you'll learn why TV shows work the way they do, what studios and networks look for in a pitch, and how to construct pitches that actually sell. Then, at the end, you'll get a chance to pitch actual studio execs and producers. And best of all...

It's $100 off for readers of this blog! The class is normally $300, but for you guys it's only $200. I hope to see you all there, and if you're interested, here's more info...

Perfecting the TV Pitch + Pitch Slam: Pitch and Sell Your Idea To A Producer
When: Saturday & Sunday, December 1 & 2, 1-5 pm
Where: mediabistro.com, Los Angeles
Cost: $200 (if you tell them you read about it on this blog... without the blog: $300!)
To sign up: Call 212-929-2588 x318
For more information:Click here, or read on below...

You've seen every episode of 24. You've read every script for My Name Is Earl. You've studied each season of The Amazing Race. And one thing's for sure -- you could write a better show than any of them. In fact, you already have an idea for the next Lost. Or How I Met Your Mother. Or America's Next Top Model. There's only one problem: You have to sell it first.

Hollywood has never been hotter for spec pilots and ideas. Networks
are searching for the next big thing, and they're willing to take a
chance on new voices.

Coming up with ideas is easy; it's pitching and selling that's hard.
This class is dedicated to helping you tweak your idea, organize the
pitch, and hone your selling skills. Whether you're working on
tomorrow's hit sitcom, drama, or the next American Idol, we'll whip your idea into shape, then give you a chance to pitch it to some of the industry's top producers, studios, and agencies at a Pitch Fest. Selling your first show is never easy. With this class, it just got a lot easier.

In this workshop, you can expect to learn:

  • The must-have ingredients of every successful pitch
  • Why different types of shows must be pitched differently
  • How to organize your idea both verbally and on paper
  • What visual tools will help your pitch
  • How to make yourself indispensable to your own idea
  • When to attach other elements -- actors, producers, directors
  • How to meet the people who can buy your idea and make them want to buy it

Hope to see you all there!

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