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For Everyone Who Believes the Print Book Experience Is Just Too Good to Replace

I work in the publishing industry, where most people have a very personal and nostalgic connection to paper-based books. We value the organic and intimate feel of the paper … the thousands of years of history of the paper book format … how much better a "real" book feels than an electronic book.

This mindset isn't limited to literary/publishing types. I know an IT director who sits in front of a computer for 12 hours a day who says he'll never prefer e-books.

Really?

Remember what the first personal computer looked like?

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Remember what the first video game looked like?

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Remember what the first cell phone looked like?

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Remember what the first iPod looked like?

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And here's what an early e-reading device looks like:

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We're witnessing the earliest stages of digital books. It's not going to stay like this for long. I promise something will come along that will make you set aside your nostalgia for the paper book.

[Argument variation: When does an e-book stop delivering a "book" experience?This article in ShelfAwareness argues that digital presentation alters our experience of a story, though I don't think it alters it in a *meaningful* way unless we're talking about interactivity, social media integration, and other interruptions/dynamics that stop us from reading the text in an isolated, focused way.]

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