6 Key Components of an Online Author Platform

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Next week, on June 2, I'll be teaching a live, online class on building your author platform. To help make "platform" more understandable and approachable as a topic, I've boiled it down into 6 key components. Here they are, briefly.

VISIBLE

  1. Your website (your hub, or Grand Central Station)
  2. Your social media activity or update stream
  3. Your content

INVISIBLE

  1. Your relationships or network
  2. Your influence and authority
  3. Your actual reach

It's impossible to have an effective visible online platform without also working on what's invisible. And that's why I think so many authors come to me and complain that their efforts aren't working. It's because the invisible components are weak, growing, or being ignored.

My class will also address the following:

  • 5 key channels of social media engagement (e-mail, community sites,
    blogs, comments, multimedia), how to use them, and how to prioritize
    them
  • What meaningful interaction looks like on social media
  • The 4 key stages of online engagement, and why it's important to take them one stage at a time (no skipping to the fourth stage!)
  • How to develop a Facebook and Twitter strategy that works for you, which might mean not using them at all
  • How to use analytics to better focus your efforts and figure out what's working and what's wasting your time

Fortunately, I discuss all of these topics frequently on this blog. If you can't take the class (and/or afford the $79 registration fee), then here are some of the my best posts where I discuss online platform.

  • Should You Blog? And If So, What Are Best Practices?
  • Figuring Out Your Facebook Strategy: 3 Tips
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