The Q: Do You Have Writer Envy?

All I've ever wanted to be one of the most clever writers in the world and, thanks to Facebook status updates, I'm not even sure I'm the most clever writer in my house. Not a day goes by where I don't read an article, short story, book or tweet and think to myself, Oh man, that's so good. I wish I'd have written that. The disease is called Writer Envy and I have it. BIG TIME.
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All I've ever wanted to be one of the most clever writers in the world and, thanks to Facebook status updates, I'm not even sure I'm the most clever writer in my house.

The Q

Not a day goes by where I don't read an article, short story, book or tweet and think to myself, Oh man, that's so good. I wish I'd have written that. The disease is called Writer Envy and I have it. BIG TIME. There are signs everywhere, like when I can't put down a book because the story is so riveting (The Rule of Four). Or when I retweet someone else's witty one-liner (like this).

This got me thinking: Is it healthy to have Writer Envy? Shouldn't we all have it? Isn't it in our nature, as writers, to be a little envious of great writing? I have to think that we weren't on the constant lookout for great writing we'd never mature as writers. So I'm glad I suffer from Writer Envy. I hope it's an ailment I carry with me the rest of my life. My only hope is that one day someone reads something I wrote and thinks, Oh man, that's so good. I wish I'd have written that.

So here's my question to you: What writers cause you to suffer from Writer Envy the most?
(Note: My top two are Kurt Vonnegut and Dave Barry. Hands down.)

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