Staying True to Yourself in Publishing

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As part of the fun and literary madness of our September 2010 Big 10 issue, we convinced memoirist extraordinaire Wade Rouse to send us a list of his Top 10 Ways to Stay True to Yourself in Publishing. A few of his (hilarious) points make up today’s installment of the Top 20 Tips From WD in 2010 series (and a regular prompt follows). Only two more to go. Believe in the voice!

No. 3: Staying True
“Be Funny, Honey! I used to worry (and read) that humor writing was too subjective to be successful. But I realized that—besides great hair, a wicked arch and a penchant for spending my Roth IRA on lip shimmer—humor was really the only thing I had going for me. Don’t ever doubt your voice."

“Look like your author shot. Seriously. If you have to crop out LBJ, or Photoshop in a full collar on that Nehru jacket, it’s time for a new photo. When you show up looking nothing like you did when you were 25, your fans will consider you a sellout."

“Heed The Advice of My Mentors, My Mom and Erma Bombeck. I once sang 'Delta Dawn' in a rural middle school talent contest to a gym filled with Conway Twitty/Loretta Lynn look-alikes who all laughed into their cowboy hats. My mom told me after it was over, 'You were true to yourself. And that can only lead to happiness.' She bought me a journal and introduced me to Erma’s column. I will forever have two Midwestern moms who taught me, as Erma once said, 'Laughter rises out of tragedy, when you need it most, and rewards you for your courage.' So laugh. Write. Be true to yourself. Happiness will follow and reward you for your courage."

—Wade Rouse, September 2010 (click here to check the full issue out, which also features Top 10 lists from Chuck Palahniuk, Jodi Picoult, Erik Larson, Sherman Alexie and Karin Slaughter)

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WRITING PROMPT: Snow Days
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As the snow melted, he discovered a chunk of a lost past.


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