Reading Selection of the Month: The Hollow Girl by Reed Farrel Coleman

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Tyrus Books, a member of the Writer's Digest publishing family, announced the launch of The Hollow Girl—the final book in its popular Moe Prager series, written by Reed Farrel Coleman. If you're a fan of crime fiction, check it out. Here are some of the reviews that have been popping up, including positive remarks from Dennis Lehane and Publishers Weekly.

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“In Reed Farrel Coleman’s hands, the Moe Prager novels are turning into one of the great series in PI literature. These are soulful, beautifully written investigations into an American Dream that slipped through our fingers when no one was looking. This series would make the greats—Chandler, Hammett, Ross and John D. McDonald, and James Crumley—very proud indeed.”—Dennis Lehane, author of Live By Night

“Coleman’s solid ninth Moe Prager novel . . . this entry will resonate even with newcomers by dint of Prager’s eloquently expressed bleak worldview.”
—Publishers Weekly

“It’s nice to report that Moe . . . is poised to escape his past at the end of this one . . . . Revelations . . . wind up this atmospheric, bluesy case.”
—Kirkus Reviews

"Coleman gives Moe an absorbing send-off in this hard-boiled series finale.... Fans of literary mysteries...will devour this book." --Library Journal

"This is Moe's final hunt, and he's going to leave behind a slew of grieving fans, but his story is wrapped up perfectly here, filled with raw social commentary, nostalgia, and guarded hopefulness. Expect those attracted to The Hollow Girl by the reality entertainment elements to be hooked by Coleman's airtight writing in this literary heavyweight PI series." --Booklist, Starred Review

"It's nice to report that Moe...is poised to escape his past at the end of this one.... Revelations...wind up this atmospheric, bluesy case." --Kirkus Reviews

Check out The Hollow Girl as well as the other books in the Moe Prager series.

Want to write crime fiction? Consider:

Learn how to write accurate crime scenes with
Howdunit: Forensics, an excellent resource for
writers who want to write crime fiction.

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