Kelly's Picks: Write Great Fiction: Plot & Structure

Get the skills you need to approach plot and structure like an experienced pro.
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Kelly's thoughts on WGF: Plot & Structure:

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This is one of the standout books in the Write Great Fiction series. First, it’s about plot and structure, and who can’t get enough of that. Second, it’s from award-winning novelist James Scott Bell who knows how to explain complicated writing concepts in a way that just makes sense.

WGF: Plot & Structure is so good, in fact, that NPR’s All Things Considered recently featured it in a piece called “Get That Book Deal: Three Books Tell You How.” Yep. It’s right up there with Stephen King’s On Writing.

The book includes tips for generating and developing sustainable story ideas; techniques for crafting strong beginnings, middles, and ends; easy-to-understand plotting diagrams and charts; thought-provoking exercises at the end of each chapter; story structure models and methods for all genres; tips and tools for correcting common plot problems; and so much more!

Read an excerpt from Chapter 1: What’s a Plot, Anyway?, and check out a short online-exclusive Q&A with Jim, where he talks about the best writing advice he’s ever received and reveals a true love of Starbuck.

You can learn more about Jim by visiting his website or following him on Twitter, where he regularly dispenses writing truisms, comments on the writing life, and posts terrific quotes from renowned authors. He’s also a regular contributor to Kill Zone, a popular blog from a group of best-selling thriller and mystery writers.

Jim’s other books for writers include Write Great Fiction: Revision and Self-Editing and the Sun-Tzu inspired The Art of War for Writers (due out in November 2009 and a future Kelly’s Pick!)

If you want more WGF: Plot & Structure and some additional, instructor-based guidance, check out this new course from WritersOnlineWorkshops.com based on this book.

(Get more Tips on Revising Your Work: 3 Easy-To-Use Revision Techniques)

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