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10 H. P. Lovecraft Quotes for Writers and About Writing

Here are 10 H. P. Lovecraft quotes for writers and about writing from the author of The Rats in the Walls, The Call of Cthulhu, and At the Mountains of Madness. In these quotes, Lovecraft covers horror, creativity, coffee, and more.

Howard Phillips Lovecraft (aka, H. P. Lovecraft) was an American writer of weird and horror fiction, including The Call of Cthulhu and At the Mountains of Madness. He wrote under several pen names (including Humphrey Littlewit, Edward Softly, and Percy Simple) and also worked as a ghostwriter.

(3 Tips for Writing Cosmic Horror That Goes Beyond.)

As such, Lovecraft was mostly unknown as a writer during his lifetime, despite an affiliation with Harry Houdini. Though he is now famous for his weird and horror fiction, he was never able to make a living off his writing and died at the age of 46.

Here are 10 H. P. Lovecraft quotes for writers and about writing.

10 H. P. Lovecraft quotes for writers and about writing

"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."

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"Never explain anything."

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"Horrors, I believe, should be original--the use of common myths and legends being a weakening influence."

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"Creative minds are uneven, and the best of fabrics have their dull spots."

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"I couldn't live a week without a private library--indeed, I'd part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I'd let go of the 1,500 or so books I possess."

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"From even the greatest of horrors irony is seldom absent."

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"The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind."

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"I like coffee exceedingly..."

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"One cannot be too careful in the selection of adjectives for descriptions."

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"No formal course in fiction writing can equal a close and observant perusal of the stories of Edgar Allan Poe or Ambrose Bierce."

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