The Art of Collaboration: 10 Tips for Writing Success

How do individual writers, with unique styles and voices, come together to produce a cohesive novel with seamless prose? Here are 10 things you need to know when attempting to write collaboratively.
Author:
Publish date:

This guest post is by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb. Gaynor is the New York Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Came Home and The Cottingley Secret and recipient of the 2015 RNA Historical Novel of the Year award. She lives in Ireland with her husband and children. Webb is the acclaimed author of historical novels Becoming Josephine and Rodin’s Lover, selected by Goodreads as a Top Pick in 2015. She is also a professional freelance editor. She lives in New England with her children and husband. Their book, Last Christmas in Paris: A Novel of WWI (William Morrow) is available now wherever books are sold.

(How to Co-Author a Book: Building Continuity and Avoiding Pitfalls)

Writing is a solitary and very personal process. Alone at our writing desks, we struggle with word count and plot, accompanied only by our self-doubt and determination. It’s no wonder, then, that the prospect of sharing some of that isolation with another writer is so appealing. Yet, a collaborative novel is a relatively rare, and slightly mythical concept. How do individual writers, with unique styles and voices, come together to produce a cohesive novel with seamless prose? Are the challenges worth the rewards, and what—if anything—can we learn from working so closely with another writer?

Last Christmas in Paris: A Novel of WWI by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

Last Christmas in Paris: A Novel of WWI by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

IndieBound | Bookshop | Amazon
[WD uses affiliate links.]

Our Top 10 Tips for Collaborative Success

1. Choose your writing partner wisely

Your best writing friend is not necessarily your best writing partner. Though friendship will likely develop as an effect of working so closely with someone, it’s not a necessity. On the other hand, being professional and challenging each other to be the best writers you can be, is. You want a satisfying working relationship in which you can trust the other to hold up their end of the bargain—and not cop out with personal excuses. Dropping the ball and personal excuses may be more common with people who will love us no matter what.

2. Have a clear vision for the book from the start: tone, plot, structure, and characters

Make sure you are—literally—on the same page so there aren’t sticky issues down the road. It’s important to be sure your vision for each of the integral pieces to the story match. One author might assume a character is a bit of a rogue, and the other author might see him as a passive sort of fellow who is shy toward women. If these character sketches aren’t fleshed out ahead of time or at least agreed upon during drafting, it could cause some in-fighting. The same goes for Discuss, discuss, discuss.

The Art of Collaboration: 10 Tips for Writing Success

3. Choose a style and structure for the book that allows dual writing to work to its best

This will be completely dependent on what the authors choose, but typically, it’s best to use more than one point of view character or use a structure that allows for easy swapping of chapters and scenes, back and forth. That being said, many authors work on a single point of view character with ease!

4. Agree on a realistic writing schedule to which you can both commit

Keep in mind, you will also have solo projects in the works. There are a variety of ways to split up the work time, including alternating chapters or writing different points of view. In addition, decide how to divide the work week between partners.

5. Leave your ego at the door

Sometimes we don’t realize how attached we are to a particular idea or thread, and one of the authors really believes that’s not the way to go. Co-writing isn’t about who is right or wrong, or who is the best writer. Both writers bring unique qualities to the table and each can put an interesting spin on something that might work. But there is a best choice for this particular story and it’s up to each author to let go of their ego and be open to suggestions to create the strongest, most engaging story possible. This brings us to our next point:

6. Be flexible

This may be the single most important aspect of co-writing. This encompasses what we’ve already mentioned above in terms of structure, style, characters, and changes to the story arc, but it also includes scheduling issues. You will learn a lot about your co-authors’ kids, pets, and family life and those responsibilities or random unforeseen issues that are beyond our control. Rework the schedule together to make it happen, and above all relax. Being a control freak while working with another person is going to cause a lot of unnecessary friction.

(10 Great Tips on How to Write a Book With a Co-Author)

7. Meet regularly (if possible), or schedule regular Skype chats

Email can only achieve so much. Continual communication is vital to ensure both authors are continually on the same page. Never assume you know what the other is thinking. English can be a nebulous language. Schedule phone calls or meetings as often as needed to work things out.

8. If it is your day to work on the book, work on the book

Eating bonbons and working through your email inbox that day should come after the writing is done. When it comes time for promotion, if you say you’ll create graphics and organize book lists, then do it. You aren’t just letting yourself down—you’re letting your writing partner down and the book will suffer for it.

9. Have fun

Share storyboards and Pinterest boards and interesting clips that relate to the book, or plan research trips together, if possible. This is a great and unique experience. Enjoy it.

10. Celebrate milestones and successes along the way

This is the best part! When word count is reached and drafts are finished, covers are revealed and foreign sales come in—be sure to toast your accomplishments! All of that hard work should be rewarded.

Writing a collaborative novel can be a hugely rewarding and enriching experience. Writers can learn so much from each other, and can certainly enhance each others’ strengths as well as provide that much-needed motivation and inspiration. When the book is complete, what could be better than having someone to celebrate that achievement with?

How to Catch an Agent's Interest with Your First Few Pages

This course is designed for writers who are ready to roll up their sleeves and take their opening pages to the next level. Weekly exercises will strengthen skills such as writing strong first lines and experimenting with voice, while weekly lectures will cover topics such as successful market examples and case studies, effective dialogue, and common ‘do’s and don’ts’ of first pages. 

Click to continue.

The Play Really Is the Thing

The Play Really Is the Thing

Studying different genres can make you a stronger writer overall. Here, author Jessica Barksdale Inclán explains why reading more Shakespeare is a great idea.

Pair vs. Pare vs. Pear (Grammar Rules)

Pair vs. Pare vs. Pear (Grammar Rules)

Prepare yourself for comparing the differences of pair, pare, and pear on with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

6 Lessons of Writing for Novelists

6 Lessons of Writing for Novelists

As the author of 16 novels, Wendy Wax shares her top 6 tips for novelists to help their writing journey go as smoothly as possible.

Elyssa Friedland: On Letting Setting Guide You

Elyssa Friedland: On Letting Setting Guide You

When author Elyssa Friedland settled on the setting for her latest novel, Last Summer at the Golden Hotel, the characters and plot came to her. Here, she discusses the importance of setting.

Alyson Gerber: On Writing Difficult Topics for Young Readers

Alyson Gerber: On Writing Difficult Topics for Young Readers

Critically acclaimed author Alyson Gerber discusses how she tackled the topic of disordered eating in her latest middle-grade novel, Taking Up Space.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: Annual Writing Competition, Submission Guidelines, and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce the extended Annual Writing Competition deadline for 2021, details on how to submit your writing to Writer’s Digest, and more!

Amorak Huey: On Stalling Out After Publication

Amorak Huey: On Stalling Out After Publication

Poet Amorak Huey hit a creative roadblock after publishing his latest poetry collection Dad Jokes From Late in the Patriarchy. He shares his cure (and more!) in this article.

From Script

New Original Podcasts, Videos, and Understanding Data as a Screenwriter (From Script)

In this week’s round-up brought to us by ScriptMag.com, Script releases brand new audible and visual content!