Are You a Word Nerd? Take This Quiz.

Take this 5-question quiz and find out how nerdy you are when it comes to your love of the English language.
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Take this 5-question quiz and find out how nerdy you are when it comes to your love of the English language.

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1. When someone misspells a word you:

A) Ignore it.
B) Quietly mention it to make sure they are aware.
C) Poke fun at the person who wrote it.
D) Bang your head against the wall and complain to anyone who will listen that the world is coming to an end because someone wrote "your" when he meant "you're."

2. When you see a misplaced comma you:

A) Shake your head in disappointment.
B) Call your closest friends and hold an emergency meeting of The Comma Club.
C) Turn it into the most clever costume at your annual Halloween party.
D) Think about grandma. (Those who have seen this know what I'm talking about.)

3. When playing a game of Scrabble, you:

A) Drop two-letter words for 50 points.
B) Always play words that help expand the board.
C) Spell long words to show off your grandiose vocabulary.
D) Tell your opponent that while you do like Scrabble, Boggle is "where it's at."

4. When writing a sentence you:

A) Agonize over every word choice
B) Rewrite it 11 times before you consider it "good enough" to eventually be edited in the revision process.
C) Diagram each sentence so you can locate and eliminate all adverbs.
D) Jot it down, high-five yourself and yell "Nailed it!"

5. When killing off a character you:

A) Always imagine every scenario.
B) Plant the murder weapon in an earlier scene.
C) Feel guilty and let him come back as a ghost.
D) Imagine it's your arch enemy and take a little too much pleasure in writing the scene.

Scores:

Mostly As: Low-level Nerd. No need for a pocket protector yet.
Mostly Bs-: Mid-level Nerd. Time to get that pocket protector.
Mostly Cs: Big Nerd. You probably correct other people's grammar when they speak, too. We're proud of you.
Mostly Ds: Colossal Nerd. There are no other words to describe you, but have no fear. You'd fit right in with the WD Staff—consider yourself an honorary member.

Thanks for playing. As a bonus, check out this article:
Get Paid to be a Word Nerd

And, if you want to make sure you are using the right word at the right time, consider:
Word Savvy

Follow me on Twitter: @BrianKlems
Read my Dad blog: TheLifeOfDad.com
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