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9 Inspirational (and Practical) Bits of Advice From Anne Rice, Catherine Coulter, David Morrell and Others

Here’s a collection of wisdoms from the star-studded panels and sessions at ThrillerFest.

Here’s a collection of wisdoms from the star-studded panels and sessions at ThrillerFest.

“Protect your voice and your vision. If going on the Internet and reading Internet reviews is bad for you, don’t do it. … Do what gets you to write and not what blocks you. … Don’t take any guff off anybody.”
--Anne Rice

“I encourage every writer to write the book that only you can write.” It’s one thing to be respectful of trends but it’s another to express your unique viewpoint in your book. “Don’t be a copycat. … The last thing I want is to see something and feel, Didn’t I just read this someplace else?
--Michaela Hamilton, editor-in-chief of Citadel/executive editor of Kensington

“The book has to deliver. … It isn’t a particular element that I’m looking for, but I want to be transported.”
--Lisa Gallagher, literary agent

“You may not think that you have an interesting story to tell and you may not think there’s something fascinating in your story, but there is.”
--Heather Drucker, publicist (HarperCollins), on how everyone has a unique personal publicity hook they can use to promote their book

“You can be as complex as you want as long as you’re clear about it.”
--David Morrell, bestselling author of First Blood

“If you’re writing thrillers, you need to read thrillers. … You can never read too much to improve your own craft.”
--Amy Rogers, science thriller writer

“Your best chance for impressing is in that first read. … It’ll never be as powerful as in that first read.” [So make sure your submission is as polished as it can be before you submit it.]
--Lisa Gallagher

“The moral of the story is, you do what’s right. And you’re going to feel what’s right. … I’ve never done a villain in first person because I’ve never felt the need to. … Do what you need to do. Do what your characters want to do.”
--Catherine Coulter, bestselling author of Bombshell

“Your obligation as writers is to distinguish yourself. … The ultimate result should be a book that you write that no one else could have written.”
--David Morrell

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