7 Quotes From Writers About Dads (Happy Father's Day)

In honor of Father's Day, we've collected several quotes from writers (and a couple from our favorite literary dads) that embody the spirit of fathers.
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In honor of Father's Day, we've collected several quotes from writers (and a couple from our favorite literary dads) that embody the spirit of fathers. From Atticus Finch to Stephen King to Tom Wolfe, we've got you covered. Oh, I even have a quote from the dad book of dad books (my book, of course). Enjoy and Happy Father's Day. #FatherlyWisdon

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“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view . . .
until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”
—Atticus Finch, To Kill a Mockingbird

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“When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”
―Mark Twain

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"My father had taught me - mostly by example - that if a man wanted to be
in charge of his life, he had to be in charge of his problems."
—Stephen King

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“Advice my father gave me: never take liquor into the bedroom.
Don’t stick anything in your ears. Be anything but an architect."
—Kurt Vonnegut

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“He adopted a role called Being a Father so that his child would
have something mythical and infinitely important: a Protector.”
—Tom Wolfe

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“Sometimes your role as a Dad is just to listen. Listen to sounds, music, those amazingly annoying Wonder Pets, whose voices are the real reason God invented Advil.”
—Brian A. Klems, Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl

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“Sometimes I think my papa is an accordion. When he looks at me and
smiles and breathes, I hear the notes.”
—Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

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