Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems

Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Chuck Sambuchino

GLA Editor Chuck Sambuchino keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences on his blog. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read Chuck’s Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest

Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer

Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


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7 Things I’ve learned So Far, by Kelsey Miller

7. You can’t force ideas to come, but you can invite them. The muse makes her own hours and if it’s her day off, then oh well. I released my first book six months ago, and I’ve been thinking about Book #2 since the moment I finished the proof pages. But you can’t force your...

Page Proofs

What No One Tells You About Page Proofs, Blurb Requests and More

We’ve all heard the middle of a manuscript referred to as “the muddle in the middle”—a nod to the challenge in sustaining momentum between the opening hook and the exciting conclusion. What you don’t hear as often is that the “muddle in the middle” applies just as aptly to the publishing process itself. For the past year I’ve...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 16

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Play (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write the poem. Possible titles include: “Play Nice,” “Play Fair,” “Play Hard,” “Play the Guitar,” etc. ***** Order the New Poet’s Market! The 2017 Poet’s Market, edited...

Build a Writing Community

Energize Your Life With a Supportive Writing Community

By Caroline Leavitt When you are writing well, you have a multitude of characters around you, but then you come up for air—too often with a pesky plot problem at hand—and sometimes you realize it’s you and your empty apartment. You might be lucky to have a spouse or friend who understands and is...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 15

For today’s prompt, we’re on our third two-for-Tuesday prompt. So pick one, combine both prompts into one poem, or write two (or more) different poems. Here are the prompts: Write a natural poem. A poem about something natural. It could be a natural way of living, something made of natural materials, nature itself, or...

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How to Review Your Plot: Using Your Notes and Outline at Revision

You’re nearing the finish line and feel like you need a final push forward to reach completion. You’ve slogged your way through the long, seemingly interminable middle, and your energy has flagged. Writers often experience self-doubt in this stage (worrying that it won’t come together well), and some have issues with finishing things. Your...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 14

For today’s prompt, write a dedication poem. Pick someone or something as a subject and dedicate your poem to him, her, it, etc. You may consider titling your poem “For Big Foot” or “To a Purple Push Pin.” Heck, you could even write a poem to your former or future self. ***** Order the...

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Successful Query: Agent Adriann Ranta and “Sad Perfect”

This series is called “Successful Queries,” and I’m posting actual query letter examples that succeeded in getting writers signed with agents. In addition to posting these query letter samples, we will also get to hear thoughts from the writer’s literary agent as to why the letter worked. The 76th installment in this series is with agent Adriann...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 13

For today’s prompt, write a poem about something that happens regularly. Could be something that happens daily, weekly, monthly, every full moon. Whatever the rotation, it happens–like writing poems each day of November. ***** Order the New Poet’s Market! The 2017 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including...

Weekly Round-up: People, Places, and Thinks

Every week our editors publish somewhere between 10 and 15 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place.  Events Our first...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 12

For today’s prompt, pick a month (any month), make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible months include January, February, March, (cruel) April, May, June, or even July, August, September, October, November, and December. Yes, there are 12 possible months; choose well, or write 12 poems (yes, I’ve thrown...

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3 Imperfect Rules for Writing

I’ve been thinking a lot about perfection recently. As a creative writing teacher, I often hear statements about the writing process from my students—statements that involve one of my least favorite words: should.

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6 Tips for Getting Rid of Writer’s Block

3. Participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). On November 1, participants work towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 on November 30. It allows you to focus on word count and the completion of a novel, even if the writing is (at first) complete crap on the page. You can...

irene-goodman

27th Free “Dear Lucky Agent” Contest: Women’s Fiction

Agent judge Irene Goodman has chosen the winners (no order): Patrycja Podrazik IN THE WARMTH OF THE SUN Margaret Porter MOST BEAUTIFUL Megan Grant DEFECTIVE GOODS ————————- Welcome to the 27th (free!) “Dear Lucky Agent” Contest on the GLA blog. This is a FREE recurring online contest with agent judges and super-cool prizes. Here’s the deal: With...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 11

For today’s prompt, write a description poem. Pick someone or something to describe. Get in depth, or just brush along the surface. ***** Order the New Poet’s Market! The 2017 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including listings for poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more! With names, contact...

The Power of Setting

3 Ways to Portray Place on the Page

  By Noah Lederman The most skilled authors know drawing upon their settings can add a breath of reality to their imagined story worlds. Here are three unexpected lessons about depicting place on the page. Sometimes a setting is so central to a story that it’s almost a character unto itself—a fully crafted, fictional...

#ThrowbackThursday: Charles M. Schulz of “Peanuts” in 1965 WD Yearbook

It’s always cool to discover old issues of Writer’s Digest featuring now-famous authors talking about their early years. It’s even more exciting to find authors sharing their longtime love of WD—like this interview with “Peanuts” creator Charles M. Schulz (with a comic he created just for WD!). For the best of present-day Writer’s Digest, check out...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 10

For today’s prompt, write a tragic poem. Two courses of action here: Write a poem that is heavy, or write a poem that is light. Or write a poem that could be heavy or light. For instance, a tragedy could be Shakespeare’s Hamlet or a bad hair day. ***** Order the New Poet’s Market!...

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7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Laurie Flynn

This is a recurring column I’m calling “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers (this installment written by Laurie Flynn, author of FIRSTS) at any stage of their career can talk about writing advice and instruction as well as how they possibly got their book agent — by sharing seven things they’ve learned along their writing journey that they...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 9

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Call Me (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write the poem. Possible titles include: “Call Me Al,” “Call Me Crazy,” “Call Me Batman,” “Call Me at 3 O’clock in the Morning,” etc. ***** Order...

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Enter the WD Your Story Contest For a Chance to Be Published

In every issue of WD, we run a column called Your Story—a place readers can share their most creative responses (in the form of a 700-word short story or a 25-word first liner, depending on the contest) to an editor-selected picture or sentence prompt. It’s free to enter, and the winning entry(s) get published in Writer’s Digest (So, win-win!). Think...

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4 Ways to Write a Compelling Character

Where do fictional characters come from, and, more important, how do you build one from scratch? For some writers, characters whisper in their ears or appear in their dreams; for others, building a character requires as much effort and forethought as constructing a house. Though the method will vary for every writer, there’s no...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 8

For today’s prompt, we’re on our second two-for-Tuesday prompt. So pick one, combine both prompts into one poem, or write two (or more) different poems. Here are the prompts: Write a nothing will be the same poem. A poem about moment after which nothing will ever be the same, because everything will change. Or…...