Editors Blog

Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems

Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Chuck Sambuchino

GLA Editor Chuck Sambuchino keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences on his blog. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read Chuck’s Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest

Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer

Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


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The Utility (and Trappings) of the Novel Outline

I’ve been selling books for more than fifteen years and learning to write novels even longer. Of all the author readings and Q&A sessions I’ve hosted (and attended), one of the most common questions among beginning writers, even curious readers, is this: Do you start with an outline? You’ve heard the pros and cons....

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4 Marks of Good Writing

How can you tell if a piece of writing is strong? Whether you’re editing for a publishing company, working as a freelancer, or self-editing, correctly assessing the quality of the work is imperative. In this excerpt from The Editor’s Companion, Steve Dunham discusses four marks of good writing and how you can recognize them in...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 297

For this week’s prompt, write a patchwork poem. Patches are literally everywhere–in quilts, on clothes, and hey, even bandages and tape are a sort of patch. Then, there are the patches we place on our hearts, souls, and spirits. Cabbage patches, patching through for communication, and the more one thinks about patches the more...

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7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Samuél L. Barrantes

This is a recurring column I’m calling “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers (this installment written by Samuél L. Barrantes, author of SLIM AND THE BEAST) at any stage of their career can talk about writing advice and instruction as well as how they possibly got their book agent — by sharing...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 296

If you haven’t caught it yet, check out the results of the 2014 November PAD Chapbook Challenge. Then, get back on over here… For this week’s prompt, write a disappointment poem. I honestly didn’t think about the timing of announcing the challenge results with this prompt, but there you go. It can be disappointing...

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How to Research Your Crime Novel

BY MICHAEL KARDOS I recently interviewed fellow crime novelist Gregg Hurwitz about his new thriller, Don’t Look Back. It’s an action-packed story set in the jungles of Oaxaca, Mexico, and I was interested in how much on-the-ground research he did. It felt like he’d done a lot. Turns out, I was right. “I shot...

Robert Lee Brewer

2014 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Results

The 2014 November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge results are in, and I can’t wait to share the winner. I always shoot for Groundhog Day to make the big announcement, but I don’t always hit that mark. The only reason I’m a day off this time around is that the competition was so fierce. A...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 295

For this week’s prompt, write a free poem. Think free parking or a free space (in a board game). Think fat free, care free, or stone free (for all the Jimi Hendrix fans out there). Or think words with free in them, a la Freedom of Information Act. You’re free to take it in...

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7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Robin Antalek

GIVEAWAY: Robin is excited to give away a free copy of her newest novel, THE GROWN UPS, to a random commenter. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (Please note that comments may take a...

Character: The Heart of Your Novel

The following is an excerpt from WD Books’ Creating Characters: The Complete Guide to Populating Your Fiction, a comprehensive reference to every stage of character development. In the book, you’ll find timely advice and helpful instruction from bestselling authors such as Nancy Kress, Elizabeth Sims, Orson Scott Card, Chuck Wendig, Hallie Ephron, Donald Maass, and...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 294

For this week’s prompt, take the phrase “State of (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write your poem. Possible titles include: “State of the Union,” “State of Ohio,” “State of Grace,” “State of Mind,” and so on. ***** Get Started...

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How 5 Great Writers Got Started on Their First Books

1. Toni Morrison -- The Spark: A Writing Group. Morrison was a 35-year-old professor at Howard University when she joined a writing group just for fun. It soon became clear that she couldn’t remain in the group unless she actually wrote something, so she began toying with a story based on an African American...

Inked by Eric Smith

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Eric Smith

This is a recurring column called “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers at any stage of their careers can talk about writing advice and instruction — by sharing seven things they’ve learned along their writing journeys that they wish they knew at the beginning. This is installment is from Eric Smith, author...

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Writing and Selling Middle Grade Fiction — Jan. 22 Webinar (With Critique) by Agent Jennifer Laughran

In this live webinar, "Writing and Selling Middle Grade Fiction," instructor and literary agent Jennifer Laughran (of Andrea Brown Literary) will talk about what's happening in the exciting Middle Grade market, as well as examine some recently published titles to see what they got right. She'll also talk revision tips and tricks to help...

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New Literary Agent Alert: Caitie Flum of Liza Dawson Associates

Caitie is seeking: Commercial and upmarket fiction with great characters and superb writing, especially historical fiction, mysteries/thrillers of all kinds, magical realism, and book club fiction; historical fiction with unusual perspectives and stories told in a unique way; police procedurals, cozy mysteries, psychological thrillers, and amateur sleuths, especially those with series potential; book club/women’s...

Word Painting Revised Edition

11 Secrets to Writing Effective Character Description

The following is an excerpt from Word Painting Revised Edition by Rebecca McClanahan, available now!   The characters in our stories, songs, poems, and essays embody our writing. They are our words made flesh. Sometimes they even speak for us, carrying much of the burden of plot, theme, mood, idea, and emotion. But they...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 293

For today’s prompt, write a beauty poem. Think Beauty and the Beast; think beauty sleep; think airbrushed images in magazines, self-esteem, and selfies. Personally, I always think of the old black & white version of King Kong and the final line of the movie. ***** Ignite Your Creativity! Jump start your creativity with four...

How to Promote Your Work Like a Pro

Now more than ever before, there are so many things we can do to promote our books, articles, stories, essays, services, and other creative works and skills—regardless of whether we’re self-published, traditionally published, or even not-yet-published. Bookstore and library events remain staples, of course, as do reviews, mentions and bylines in prominent media. But...