Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems
Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Cris Freese
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


WD Wants You: Write a Reckless Blitzen, an Angry Santa

Gorilla suits, zombies, The Universe popping up as a character and saying things like, “You’re getting too big for your fangs.” And that’s only one Friday. For a trip to the wonderful, fun and often enchantingly weird, check out my lunch buddy (and WD Online Community Editor) Brian A. Klems’ #StoryFriday...

What is Mainstream Fiction? Upmarket Fiction?

Q: The more industry blogs I read, the more confused I get about which category my novel falls into. It seems to sit on middle ground between literary and commercial, which some agents have said they are looking for. One agent advised me to call it “literary commercial.” I have also seen...

A Little Friendly Interview with YA Author Siobhan Vivian

It’s that time of year. My fall semester officially ended last night and MFA applications are due for potential incoming students in just a few weeks… I only have one semester left of school—a time period which will be heavily focused on writing my thesis. And then it’s off into the...

Ditch the Fancy Pens: 12 Gifts for Writers

In the November/December issue of WD, we featured a batch of holiday gifts for writers, as picked by WD editors. In case you missed the issue, here they are, recapped with some new additions—so that the writer in your life doesn’t end up with another fancy notebook he’s scared to write...

I'm Now a Regular Contributor to Writer Unboxed

I’m very proud to announce that, starting this week, I’ll be a regular contributor to Writer Unboxed. My first post, to appear this Friday, will discuss the 5 things that make me stop reading an online site or blog (based on my experience curating Best Tweets). —— Housekeeping note: I’m taking...

Defining Picture Books, Middle Grade and Young Adult

Q: I’m writing a children’s book and I see that most publishers have different classifications within the genre—picture books, middle grade, young adult, etc. What are the differences? –Kara G. A: Like any genre, there are plenty of subcategories for children’s books. Ultimately, though, there are five main classifications that you...

The wind in my face, the play in writing

After one of my last posts about my struggle with self doubt, a reader made a good point: Writing should be fun. We should enjoy it. I am grateful for her comment, for this reminder. I agree with her and I didn’t mean to imply that the process should be all...

Agent Advice: Holly Root of The Waxman Literary Agency

This installment features Holly Root of The Waxman Literary Agency. Holly began her publishing career as an editor in Christian publishing in Nashville, TN before coming to New York and joining the William Morris Agency’s agent trainee program. She then moved to Trident Media Group, where she sold audio rights for...

AFI's Top Movies and TV Shows of 2009…

AFI has released it’s lists of the top movies and TV shows of 2009… Thoughts? AFI’s Top 10 Films of 2009: “Coraline” “The Hangover” “The Hurt Locker” “The Messenger” “Precious: Based on the Novel PUSH by Sapphire” “A Serious Man” “A Single Man” “Sugar” “Up” “Up in the Air” AFI‘s Top...

Best Tweets for Writers (week ending 12/11/09)

I watch Twitter, so you don’t have to. Visit each Sunday for the week’s best Tweets. If I missed a great Tweet, leave it in the Comments. Always welcome your suggestions on improving this weekly feature. Best of Best What a Bestselling Author Can Teach You About Hooking Your Readers@copyblogger Top...

Join Me for 'How to Land a Literary Agent'

You hear me talk a lot on this blog about the writers’ conferences I attend and the presentations I give on agents and pitching.  Well, if you’ve ever wanted to attend such a conference but can’t because of money or proximity issues, here is your chance to listen in and ask...

Footnotes: 8 Articles on When Writing Becomes Revision

“The most valuable of talents is never using two words when one will do.”  -Thomas Jefferson Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA blog where I pick a subject and provides several interesting articles on said topic. Today’s topic is revision. As the NaNoWriMo induced writing stupor wears off, you...

The Key Ingredient of a Novel . . .

As I wrote on the WD Forum: Samwise Gamgee or Middle Earth? The simple elegance of Hemingway’s prose or Santiago’s quest for his marlin? Dracula, Transylvania or the book’s letter/diary format? I’m whipping up the March/April InkWell section of Writer’s Digest magazine right now, and one of the features we run...

10 Tips on Writing Picture Books

10. Beware of dialogue-heavy picture book manuscripts. 9. The only beef editors and agents have against rhyming picture books is that they’re so often poorly written. 8. Manuscripts need to be more perfect than ever before they’re ready for submission. Jean Reidy is a freelance writer and children's author. Her first children's book, Too...

How I Got My Agent: Becky Levine

"How I Got My Agent" is a recurring feature on the GLA blog. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. If you have a literary agent and would be interested in writing a short guest column for this GLA blog,...

Unofficial Agent Appreciation Day!

I was kind of “off the grid” Friday (planning a party – see next post blog entry), which explains why I didn’t post this earlier. Friday was named “Unofficial Agent Appreciation Day,” so I wanted to post a quick something recognizing my agent, Sorche Fairbank. That’s Sorche in the middle. I...

Buy and Ask For Books This Christmas!

It’s no secret that the publishing industry is hurting a bit money-wise. It’s up to all of us to do our little part, and there’s no better time than Christmas. Send out e-mails and ask friends and family what books they want for the holidays. Then suggest some for yourself as...

Writing Prompt: Steal From the Real

I’m sneaking off a bit early to immerse myself in last-minute preparations for the WD Intensive this weekend. If you missed it earlier this week, check out my post on the event and 7 reasons an editor might toss a novel submission in the round file. Hope to see you in...

5 for Friday: Quotes and Meditations for our writing

  Here are 5 quotes and their matching meditations from Walking on Alligators, by Susan Shaughnessy. Some reminders for when you need them… perhaps to keep you writing through the weekend. 1.      “When stuff in life gets really rough, I would just die if I was not writing a novel. Once...

Agent Advice: Adriann Ranta of Wolf Literary Services, LLC

This installment features Adriann Ranta of Wolf Literary Services LLC. Adriann was previously with Anderson Literary Management. She is looking for: fiction and limited nonfiction, with an emphasis on children’s, middle grade, and young adult books. She is most interested in realistic, true-to-life stories with conflicts based in the real world....

The Rappaport Agency Closes

Got an e-mail yesterday from agent Jenny Rappaport with the sad news that her agency is closing. I believe Jenny used to be part of L. Perkins Associates before moving out on her own a few years back. We never did get the opportunity to cross paths and meet. Take note...