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Writing Editor Blogs

Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Chuck Sambuchino

GLA Editor Chuck Sambuchino keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences on his blog. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read Chuck’s Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest

Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Questions & Quandaries
by Brian Klems

Don’t know the difference between “who” and “whom”? Facing an ethical dilemma about accepting gifts from subjects? Let the informative (and humorous) columnist Brian A. Klems answer some of your most pressing grammatical, ethical, business and writing-related questions. Check out his advice and don’t hesitate to ask a question—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer

Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


7 Things I’ve Learned so Far, by Laura Krughoff

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3. Fix the end by fixing the middle. I routinely tell my students that if they’re struggling with the ending of a story, it is probably because they haven’t quite worked out the conflict. I spent a long time struggling with how to end my novel, and I rewrote the final chapter many times before it occurred to me to take my own advice. A difficult but essential scene was missing, and once I had that in place, I finally understood how to bring the novel to a satisfying conclusion. I could have rewritten that ending until the cows came home, but it was only by addressing a problem much earlier in the novel that I was able to get the ending right. Read more

Beth Copeland: Poet Interview

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Please join me in welcoming Beth Copeland to the Poetic Asides blog. I first came across her work last year when I judged a North Carolina book contest. Her book, Transcendental Telemarketer … Read more

The Writer’s Promise: How to Craft a Book’s Pitch

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I was in the ad biz back in the post-Mad Men days and rather than quaffing martinis and playing office politics, we spent a lot of time focusing on the “promise” of a product: it’s emotional payoff rather than its efficacy. Sure, Spongy paper towels absorb liquids just as fast as its competitors at half the cost, but how does that make the housekeeper feel? It’s the difference between mere description and going beyond it to add an emotional dimension… Read more

WD Poetic Form Challenge: Somonka

Robert Lee Brewer

It’s time for another poetic form challenge. If you’re wondering where the lai results are, don’t worry: I’m nearly finished with them, and they should be posted later this week. As regular … Read more

New Literary Agent Alert: Monica Odom of Liza Dawson Associates

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She is seeking: Monica is building her client list with a focus on literary fiction, women’s fiction and voice-driven memoir, as well as a focus on nonfiction in the areas of pop culture, food and cooking, history, politics, and current affairs. Monica is looking for writers with big ideas who push the boundaries of storytelling and its traditional forms. She is especially interested in writers with strong social media platforms who have something original to say. Read more

Author Interview: Nancy Grossman, Author of A WORLD AWAY

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It’s time to meet another debut author and learn from their successful publishing journey. Today we meet Nancy Grossman, author of the 2012 young adult debut, A WORLD AWAY (Disney-Hyperion, out in paperback in 2013), a story about an Amish girl who visits the outside world.

After meeting an Amish teenager during a trip to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, author Nancy Grossman imagined what it would be like to take the girl home with her. Eventually those imaginings became her first novel, A World Away, which was named to Kirkus Reviews’ list of the Best Teen Books of 2012. Read more

Agent John Cusick Moves to Greenhouse Literary — and Seeks Children’s Book Queries

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Literary agent John Cusick recently switched agencies. He left his position at Scott Treimel Literary and is now with Greenhouse Literary. When I heard he moved, I asked him if he had time to answer a few questions so writers could catch up with him. Here’s what he had to say. Read on to learn if John is a good fit for your work! (Also, I should mention that John is also an author, and he just had a book released in Sept. 2013: CHERRY MONEY BABY, a young adult novel from Candlewick that got a starred review in Publishers Weekly.) Read more

How to Write for Writer’s Digest (… Even if You’ve Never Written for Magazines Before)

Yesterday we updated the Submission Guidelines for Writer’s Digest magazine (just some routine tidying—adjusting links, adding a couple sections, overanalytically tweaking a word here and there, then immediately changing it back, etc.). … Read more

Raina Masters: Poet Interview

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It’s time for another featured poet/poem from the 2013 April PAD Challenge. Every Friday, we’ll roll out another poet and poem from the Top 25. This week, I’m happy to introduce Raina … Read more

Ripple Grove Press Seeks Picture Book Submissions

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Meet Ripple Grove Press, they’re a publishing house actively seeking picture book submissions. Check them out and see if they’re a good fit for your work.

ABOUT RIPPLE GROVE: Ripple Grove Press is a family-owned children’s picture book publishing company started in 2013. “Our mission is to create picture books that come from life experiences, elegant imagination, and the deep down passion in our hearts. We want each Ripple Grove Press book to enlighten a child’s mind with fun and wonder. Ripple Grove Press searches for a powerful ‘timeless’ feel in each book we publish. Our stories will make you laugh or think or keep you guessing and dreaming. We hope our books find their way to the cozy spot on the floor and are the last ones read at bedtime.” Read more

Somonka: Poetic Forms

Robert Lee Brewer

The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but … Read more

Fruitless First Draft Struggles

The following is a guest blog post by the winner of the 82nd Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition, Dan J. Fiore. Dan shares his thoughts on the first draft writing process, common … Read more

Is Your Blog a Book? Agent Kate McKean Explains in Her Oct. 22 Webinar

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We’ve all see the overnight successes of blog-to-book deals. Whether it’s a traditional blog, a Twitter feed, a Tumblr blog, or something else entirely, publishers and agents are actively looking to discover new talent on the Internet. Could you be next? Luckily, to answer that question, we have literary agent Kate McKean (Howard Morhaim Literary) to teach her webinar, “Is Your Blog a Book: When, How, Why (and Why Not) Your Social Media Could Become a Traditionally Published Book” at 1 p.m., EST, Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. The webinar lasts 90 minutes.

This live webinar will cover what publishers are looking for in blog-to-book properties, what it takes to make the Internet-to-print jump, and how to know if the traffic you have is big enough to get an agent’s or editor’s attention. Agent Kate McKean has ushered dozens of blog-to-book properties into print—from the New York Times Bestselling (twice!) ICanHasCheezburger.com to Noah Scalin’s online art project Skulladay.com, to numerous Twitter and Tumblr accounts. She’ll show you what she’s looking for, and not looking for, in good writing on the web. Kate will be critiquing the query of all attendees; don’t forget that at least 4 agents have signed writers after seeing their work as part of a WD boot camp / webinar. Read more

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 241

Robert Lee Brewer

In case you haven’t seen it yet, I just wanted to share the first blog post review of my debut poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems. It touches on many of the … Read more

How I Got My Agent: Tracy Solheim, Author of GAME ON

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“How I Got My Agent” is a recurring feature on the Guide to Literary Agents Blog, with this installment featuring Tracy Solheim, author of GAME ON. These columns are great ways for you to learn how to find a literary agent. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. Tracy’s agent is Melissa Jeglinski of The Knight Agency.

GIVEAWAY: Tracy is excited to give away a free copy of her novel to a random commenter. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (UPDATE: oldestgenxer won.) Read more

Thomas Lux: Poet Interview

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Please join me in welcoming Thomas Lux to the Poetic Asides blog. Years ago, we talked after Tammy and I read some poems on the local stage of the Decatur Book Festival. … Read more

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Karen Dietrich

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1. Write through the wait. When The Girl Factory was on submission to publishers last October, I felt like I was in limbo. There is a waiting game to play and I’m terribly impatient. The first few days, I spend a lot of time checking my inbox for emails from my agent and thinking about possible responses from publishers (even though my agent guided me through the process and assured me that responses don’t usually arrive quickly).

GIVEAWAY: Karen is excited to give away a free copy of her novel to a random commenter. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (UPDATE: burrowswrite won.) Read more

2013 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Guidelines

Robert Lee Brewer

In a little over two weeks, we’ll begin another November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. In my mind, I always think of April as a free-for-all; November is when I try (though don’t … Read more

New Literary Agent Alert: Connor Goldsmith of Foreword Literary

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He is seeking: He is interested in a wide range of fiction, and is looking for literary fiction, speculative fiction (scifi/fantasy), and psychological thrillers. Under the umbrella of speculative fiction he is especially interested in urban fantasy, urban science fiction, and magical realism. He is particularly looking for fiction from LGBT and racial minority perspectives. In nonfiction, he is looking for books by recognized experts with broad, established platforms. Subjects of interest include cinema, television, theater, mass media, historical biography, and progressive politics. Read more

Pre-Plot & Complete Your Book in a Month: October 17 Webinar Ideal for Novelists and Memoirists

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Are you a writer who prefers to pre-plot? Or, do you simply like to jump in and begin writing without much pre-planning? Perhaps you’re just starting out and don’t know your plotting preference? Whatever kind of writer you are, you’re much more likely to finish a fast draft if you have a basic grasp of the dramatic action plot and the character emotional development plot of your stories before you begin writing. You’ll also find that if you do more pre-plotting up-front you’ll have fewer rewrites later.

Martha Alderson works with writers from all over the world. She’ll share with you a simple, visual technique to help you pre-plot your story quickly. You’ll also receive a template to help you organize your time in the actual writing phase. We guarantee you’ll finish a fast draft of your story in a month. Once you assemble the plot items on her checklist and you’ll be ready to begin your one-month writing challenge. It’ all part of her new webinar, “How to Pre-Plot & Complete a Novel or Memoir in a Month” — The Benefits of Writing a Fast Draft from Beginning to End. It all happens at 1 p.m., EST, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, and lasts 90 minutes. Read more

How to Maximize a Book Festival Appearance: 9 Tips

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This past weekend, I had the honor of signing books at my local (awesome) book festival: Cincinnati’s Books by the Banks Book Fair. It happens every year in the fall, and this was my third appearance. Every time I sign books at a regional fair in Ohio or Kentucky, I seem to get better at interacting with readers. If you’ll be appearing at a future book fair to promote your traditional or self-published book, here are some quick tips that may help you.

1. If possible, stand. I’ve read multiple places that you make a better first impression if you’re standing when people first meet you. So stand if your health allows it. Read more

Larry Lawrence: Poet Interview

Larry Lawrence

So as promised in the 2013 April PAD Challenge results post, I’m going to start featuring a poem and poet from the Top 25 every Friday between now and the next challenge. … Read more

Should you quit your job to write full time?

The following is a guest post by WD Contributing Editor Linda Formichelli, from her new book, Write Your Way Out of the Rat Race … And Step Into a Career You Love. … Read more

5 Ways To Be a Good Literary Citizen

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A term I’ve heard with increasing frequency is “literary citizen.” It is usually spoken of along with an admonition to be a good one. But how exactly are we supposed to be good literary citizens, and why should we try?

Writing is often thought of as a solitary occupation, and it’s true we writers spend a lot of time alone. However, we write so people can read our writing—a writer is inherently part of a group. Yet even in graduate school, surrounded by other emerging writers, I didn’t think of myself as part of a literary community. Of course, community meant something different in the pre-social-networking nineties, but the idea that I was a writer within a larger writing community didn’t dawn on me until I was well established in New York. But if you’re writing, you’re a literary citizen, so you should make the society a nicer place to live.

GIVEAWAY: Allison is excited to give away a free copy of her novel to a random commenter. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (UPDATE: rmonk won.) Read more

2013 April PAD Challenge: Results

Robert Lee Brewer

Okay, results sounds kind of weird for the April PAD Challenge. It’s more of a re-cap, I guess, or a snapshot. One thing I’ve learned over the years is that what happens … Read more

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