Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Jess Zafarris
Content Strategist Jess Zafarris covers everything about writing on this blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, she’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from herself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out her advice—your writing career will thank you. Read The Writer’s Dig


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


On Ending a Creative Drought

The advice below was much needed today. I opened Julia Cameron’s book for some inspiration and there is was. I’ve felt this heaviness lately, this seriousness, when it comes to my writing. I’m realizing this is mostly due to the fact that the final months of my program are approaching and...

Try the "Cut Up" Technique to Free Your Writing

The following advice was shared by Thomas E. Kennedy as part of Glimmer Train’s recent bulletin (click here for full bulletin). Working in Paris in the late 1950s, Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs developed the so-called “cut-up” technique to try to get deeper into the unreasonable heart of a material...

Is Your Story Worth Saving?

I am not knee deep in the revision process. I am neck deep. So deep that I often feel like I’m drowning. It’s Thesis Time and I’m weeding through all my stories, trying to figure out which ones I want to continue to work on, continue to revise. This is a...

Agent Advice: Marlene Stringer of The Stringer Literary Agency

This installment features Marlene Stringer of The Stringer Literary Agency. She is seeking: Fiction interests include mystery, thrillers, contemporary and urban fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, women’s fiction, romance, and YA/teen. Nonfiction interests include history, military history, parenting, music, sports, and science.

Pronoun Problems: "He/She," "He or She," or Just Plain "He"?

Q: Is there a special rule regarding which pronoun to use when talking about a non-specific gender (“he/she,” “he or she,” “he”) or is it completely the writer’s choice? —Jarrett Z. A: For years, the masculine pronouns (he, his, him) graced most literary work when referring to a non-specific gender. It...

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Patricia Stoltey

This is a new recurring column I’m calling “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers at any stage of their career can talk about seven things they’ve learned along their writing journey that they wish they knew at the beginning. This installment is from writer Patricia Stoltey. Patricia Stoltey is the...

Jump-start your weekly creativity with . . . shoelaces.

Thanks to Jessica Strawser for filling in as PromptMaster on Friday — and to everyone who wrote a story in response to her post! WRITING PROMPT: The Lace Reader Feel free to take the following prompt home or post your response (500 words or fewer, funny, sad or stirring) in the...

Storyline Contest Closed

The (third) “Worst Storyline Ever” Contest is now closed. Thank you to all who entered. I got a few e-mails saying that blog comment functionality was iffy. This caught me by surprise. Tell you what. I will accept entries via email to literaryagent@fwmedia.com through the end of today, Monday, March 29,...

Best Tweets for Writers (week ending 3/26/10)

I watch Twitter, so you don’t have to. Visit each Sunday for the week’s best Tweets. If I missed a great Tweet, leave it in the Comments. Always welcome your suggestions on improving this weekly feature. Quick plug: Check out these upcoming Writer’s Digest webinars: Break Into Corporate Writing by freelancer...

How I Got My Agent: Marianne Elliott

"How I Got My Agent" is a recurring feature on the GLA blog. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. If you have a literary agent and would be interested in writing a short guest column for this GLA blog,...

Agent Advice: Anne Hawkins of John Hawkins & Associates

This installment features Anne Hawkins of John Hawkins & Associates, Inc. She is seeking: Anne has an eclectic list, ranging from thrillers to literary fiction to serious nonfiction. She has particular interests in science, history, public policy, medicine and women’s issues. She is not looking to represent self-help, new age, erotica, how-to,...

Cover Band Soap Opera: 'Creep' by Radiohead

For anyone who follows the ridiculous adventures of my Cincinnati rock cover band, you may have noticed that I don’t put up much video.  Truth is, I’m self-conscious. Someone missed a note, or this didn’t sound right, or that’s blurry, blah blah blah.    Well, no more of that. This is my...

On Observing

“Most of us, most of the time, shunt most of what we notice into the same recycling bin where we dump what we imagine. Luckily for writers, at least a little of what we dump can be retrieved and recycled. Once you are at work, most of the memories that serve...

Breaking the Rules

While Zac takes some time off, today’s Promptly guest post comes from WD Editor Jessica Strawser. —Back when I was a student in journalism school, I took an advanced magazine feature writing class. We began by studying selections from master feature writers—our visiting professor among them—and discussing what made them such...

What To Spec This Year…

Thanks to Sam for spotting Alex Epstein‘s link to Alex Freedman‘s study on what TV specs to write this year… and what not to.  Very interesting– and helpful!  Click HERE to check it out… You might also like:No Related Posts

How to make your story truly your own

The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations is a list George Polti created to catalog every dramatic situation that might occur in a story or performance. Every last situation. Essentially meaning: no other situation exists outside these thirty-six. Haven’t you heard this from writing teachers, too? That there are only so many plots, so...

New Agent Alert: Marissa Walsh of Shelf Life Literary

Note from Chuck (4-28-2010): Soon after posting this new agent alert, Marissa contacted me and said she is joining the crew at FinePrint Literary Management. All her bio info remains the same. Reminder: Newer agents are golden opportunities for new writers because they’re likely building their client list; however, always make sure...

How to Market and Sell Your Books

I have some exciting news regarding WD’s webinars. Agent Chip MacGregor, founder of MacGregor Literary, is teaching a new, amazing class called “Marketing for Authors.” Chip, who runs a popular agent blog, is very wise when it comes to marketing both fiction and nonfiction. We are fortunate to have him aboard...