Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems
Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Cris Freese
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


Footnotes: 7 ''Best Of'' Lists for Great 2009 Books

“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends;they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors,and the most patient of teachers.” ~Charles W. Eliot Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA blog where I pick a subject and provides several interesting articles on said topic. “Best Of” lists abound...

Should You Start With Plot or Character(s)?

Whether plot or character comes first when composing a novel is sort of like the chicken and egg thing. It greatly depends on the author’s point of view. Plot and character are so entwined that it’s often hard to even separate the two. Like all elements of a novel-dialogue, exposition, description,...

This Is Never Going to Work

Today (catching up on reading), I read the New York Times story of how Reader’s Digest is trying to re-invent itself—or stay alive. A few highlights from the article: Posters in the corridors of this mostly empty building trumpet something called the FACE plan, an acronym for fast, accountable, candid and...

5 Things That Make Me Stop Reading Websites & Blogs

Just in case you missed it, my first contribution to Writer Unboxed went live last week: 5 Things That Make Me Stop Reading Websites & Blogs It’s generated a lot of excellent discussion (45 comments!), where I’ve contributed some additional tips and answered questions. I think the discussion also made me...

Books! Books! And more books!

  -One of my overflowing bookcases- I am obsessed with books. What writer isn’t? It’s a problem actually—the piles of books beside the nightstand, under the coffee table, all over the kitchen table. And then there are the three overflowing bookcases. My mother actually gave my husband and me a huge...

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Debbie Fuhry

This is a new recurring column I’m calling “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers at any stage of their career can talk about seven things they’ve learned along their writing journey that they wish they knew at the beginning. This installment is from writer Debbie Fuhry. Debbie Fuhry is a...

Agent Advice: Katie Grimm of Don Congdon Associates, Inc.

This installment features Katie Grimm of Don Congdon Associates, Inc. Katie has been an agent for two years. She seeks: literary fiction, mystery, women's fiction, historical fiction, thrillers/suspense, short stories, multi-cultural, offbeat/quirky, young adult, middle-grade, and children's literature. Her nonfiction interests are: history, biography, religion, science, drama/music, multi-cultural, memoirs, travel, adventure/true story,...

Holiday Prompts and Gift Ideas for the Snowed In

It’s that time of year again: the WD office is gradually falling silent, and any repairmen or squirrels mulling about the roof of F+W Media are commonly mistaken for rabbit fur–wearing holiday heroes. Due to an insufficient present stockpile and a few remaining vacation days, I’ll be out for the rest...

How I Got My Agent: Kody Keplinger

"How I Got My Agent" is a recurring feature on the GLA blog. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. If you have a literary agent and would be interested in writing a short guest column for this GLA blog,...

Footnotes: 5 Articles on Writing Those First Pages

“There’s nothing to writing.  All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein.”  ~ Walter Wellesley “Red” Smith Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA blog where I pick a subject and provides several interesting articles on said topic. You never get a second chance to...

Best Tweets for Writers (week ending 12/18/09)

I watch Twitter, so you don’t have to. Visit each Sunday for the week’s best Tweets. If I missed a great Tweet, leave it in the Comments. Always welcome your suggestions on improving this weekly feature. Best of Best 8 Ways of Seeing People that Can Sabotage Your Writing by @dahveed_miller@mystorywriter...

You haven’t yet published…so, are you not a real writer?

  In Stephen King’s On Writing the author talks about success.  He says something like this(I’m completely paraphrasing here): that many people don’t care about what you’re writing and will think your work is of little importance UNTIL you’ve been published.  Then, suddenly, everyone comes scurrying out of the cracks and exclaims:...

WD Wants You: Write a Reckless Blitzen, an Angry Santa

Gorilla suits, zombies, The Universe popping up as a character and saying things like, “You’re getting too big for your fangs.” And that’s only one Friday. For a trip to the wonderful, fun and often enchantingly weird, check out my lunch buddy (and WD Online Community Editor) Brian A. Klems’ #StoryFriday...

What is Mainstream Fiction? Upmarket Fiction?

Q: The more industry blogs I read, the more confused I get about which category my novel falls into. It seems to sit on middle ground between literary and commercial, which some agents have said they are looking for. One agent advised me to call it “literary commercial.” I have also seen...

A Little Friendly Interview with YA Author Siobhan Vivian

It’s that time of year. My fall semester officially ended last night and MFA applications are due for potential incoming students in just a few weeks… I only have one semester left of school—a time period which will be heavily focused on writing my thesis. And then it’s off into the...

Ditch the Fancy Pens: 12 Gifts for Writers

In the November/December issue of WD, we featured a batch of holiday gifts for writers, as picked by WD editors. In case you missed the issue, here they are, recapped with some new additions—so that the writer in your life doesn’t end up with another fancy notebook he’s scared to write...

I'm Now a Regular Contributor to Writer Unboxed

I’m very proud to announce that, starting this week, I’ll be a regular contributor to Writer Unboxed. My first post, to appear this Friday, will discuss the 5 things that make me stop reading an online site or blog (based on my experience curating Best Tweets). —— Housekeeping note: I’m taking...

Defining Picture Books, Middle Grade and Young Adult

Q: I’m writing a children’s book and I see that most publishers have different classifications within the genre—picture books, middle grade, young adult, etc. What are the differences? –Kara G. A: Like any genre, there are plenty of subcategories for children’s books. Ultimately, though, there are five main classifications that you...