Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 568

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a service poem.
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For today's prompt, write a service poem. Whether they recognize it as such, human beings are very good at providing services to each other, whether it's holding a door open for someone, sharing knowledge, or listening to someone's problems. Of course, there is military service, volunteer service, and serving people at restaurants as well. 

So there are plenty of obvious entryways into writing a service poem, but don't be afraid to expand the idea of service to include things like internet service, cell service, and many other serviceable opportunities to poem.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

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Here’s my attempt at a Service Poem:

“In Summer,” by Robert Lee Brewer

The sign reads NO SHOES NO SHIRT NO
SERVICE, but it's hot in summer,
and teens stretch definitions so
signs reading NO SHOES NO SHIRT NO
SERVICE work with flip flops and towels.
No one wants to be a bummer,
so signs read NO SHOES NO SHIRT NO
SERVICE, except in the summer.

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