Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 552

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a clear poem.
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For today's prompt, write a clear poem. There are many ways to interpret what clear could mean. For starters, there are clear nail colors and clear plastic containers. Of course, clear directions are easy to follow. Clear weather is pretty nice. Clearing the air can help mend disputes. So clear your throat, clear your mind, and write your clear poem today.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

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Here’s my attempt at a Clear Poem:

“Alls Clear”

The deer hesitate before emerging
into the clearing. They see me,
but I've been here before,
and we have an understanding.
Per usual, they look and eat,
look and eat. A head raises
and sniffs the air, always
ready to bolt back to
the dark cover of the woods,
always making sure alls clear,
and for this moment,
it is.

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