Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 536

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a bright side poem.
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For today's prompt, write a bright side poem. If 2020 has taught one thing, it's the amount of negative emotions that can be felt and displayed, whether it's anger, anxiety, depression, or some other feeling. But for this week, let's focus solely on the bright side of a situation.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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The Complete Guide of Poetic Forms

Play with poetic forms!

Poetic forms are fun poetic games, and this digital guide collects more than 100 poetic forms, including more established poetic forms (like sestinas and sonnets) and newer invented forms (like golden shovels and fibs).

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Bright Side Poem:

“This one moment”

I know the outside world cracks open
nearly every second of every day
and that I wish I could take the pain
everyone feels and whisk it away,
but for this one moment in this room
I let myself sing and dance without fear,
because my children are healthy and happy,
and we're all together right now, right here.

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