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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 524

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an outdoors poem.

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For today’s prompt, write an outdoors poem. The poem could be about something that happens outdoors. Or it could be a wish to do something outdoors. Of course, poets can also write an ode to the "Great Outdoors," but I know more than a few folks who aren't huge fans of getting out into nature. So an anti-outdoors poem is definitely a possibility as well.

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The Complete Guide of Poetic Forms

Play with poetic forms!

Poetic forms are fun poetic games, and this digital guide collects more than 100 poetic forms, including more established poetic forms (like sestinas and sonnets) and newer invented forms (like golden shovels and fibs).

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Outdoors Poem:

“PSA: To Each Their Own”

Getting outside is easy to do
unless you're an animal at the zoo,
a person suffering from the flu,
or someone receiving a big tattoo.

But that new tattoo just might portray
a kangaroo making his getaway
by jumping a fence on Saturday
while sneezing into a perfect soufflé.

And if that seems a bit too silly,
remember animals prefer to be
out where the wind and the air is free
and the sun delivers vitamin D.

So if there's a message to confide,
one message by which we could all abide,
it's that its okay to want to hide
and also all right to get thee outside.

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