Well, this is our first Wednesday Poetry Prompt since before the 2020 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. And as you've probably noticed, we have a brand new website. This may end up being a good thing in the long run, but I admit that it's a little unsettling in the short term. I'm the type of person who usually gets annoyed by site redesigns, so I apologize in advance if you're that type of person too. We'll get through this together. 

You've probably also noticed there's not yet a way to comment on posts. I believe this will be worked out soon so that folks with Disqus accounts can comment. Go to Disqus to create a free new account, and hopefully we'll have more details to share by next Wednesday. In the meantime, I guess we can poem from home.

Also, you may have noticed that our comments were unable to migrate to the new site. While I was unable to pull older comments, I was able to copy and paste comments to the 2020 April PAD Challenge. So if you're in search of a poem you posted on the site, you can send me an email at rbrewer@aimmedia.com with the subject line "2020 April PAD Challenge," and I'll try to get them to you.

Now on to the poeming...

For today’s prompt, write an unsettled poem. Of course, I'm thinking in terms of an hours-old website launch. But there are plenty of more unsettling situations in the world. Sometimes these situations turn out to be bad; other times, they work out. Here's hoping we can settle back into a regular rhythm sooner than later.

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the_complete_guide_of_poetic_forms_definitions_examples_robert_lee_brewer-196x300 copy

Play with poetic forms!

Poetic forms are fun poetic games, and this digital guide collects more than 100 poetic forms, including more established poetic forms (like sestinas and sonnets) and newer invented forms (like golden shovels and fibs).

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Unsettled Poem:

“Care”

This should be there,
and that should be this.
Maybe she cares
about our last kiss.

But then again,
who can really say
covered in rain
on a sunny day?

I'm just alone
even when I'm not
and on my own
in this boiling pot.

This should be there,
and there should be here.
Know that I care
about all your fear.

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