Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 494

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a fable poem.
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Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a fable poem.

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For today’s prompt, write a fable poem. A fable is a story with animals as characters that conveys a moral of some sort. So your poem could be a fable. Or it could mention a fable as an aside. Or allude to one in a re-imagining of your poem. As always, have fun with it and don't be afraid to take risks.

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Recreate Your Poetry!

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Revision doesn’t have to be a chore—something that has to be done after the joy of the first draft. In fact, revision should be viewed as an enjoyable extension of the creation process—something that you want to experience after the joy of the first draft.

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Here’s my attempt at a Fable Poem:

“the ant and the grasshopper”

The ant worked hard to prepare for winter
while the grasshopper played like a sinner
through the summer months filled with song and dance
and, to be frank, quite a little romance.

When winter came, the ants took their leisure,
and grasshopper paid for all his pleasure,
but, for the ants, their hard work never ceased,
and their endless toiling never once eased:

So, sure, the grasshopper ran into strife,
but, at the least, he lived during his life.

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